9 Essential Oils That Are Safe For Dogs // Paws Insider (2022)

9 Essential Oils That Are Safe For Dogs // Paws Insider (1)

Alex Vicente • Updated on September 29, 2022

When it comes to dog owners, and pet owners in general, there isn’t much that someone would not do for their beloved pet(s). Essential oils have been becoming more popular and widely used from direct contact on the skin to diffusers, being able to provide a variety of benefits to not just humans, but pets and dogs as well.

Not all essential oils are ok for dogs, so you will want to consult with your vet first, and be sure you follow the guidelines on which ones are safe, and how to best apply them to your furry little friend. So if you’re wanting to find more ways to help your pet’s overall health and maybe even treat them a little extra, continue reading to find out how you might be able to help your pet with these 6 essential oils.

Table of Contents

Essential Oils Safe for Your Dog

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If you’re into essential oils and wonder if their benefits can be transferred to dogs, you’re in luck. These 9 essential oils are very beneficial for dogs in a variety of ways. As long as they are diluted properly and there are precautions when using them for the first time on your pet, essential oils can help your dog with inflammation, anxiety, fungus, virus, and much more.

Anymore, people are searching for the most natural yet still effective way to improve overall health for themselves. However, if you are a dog owner, then we all know you will do just about anything for your dog. Essential oils have been shown to help in many ways from mood to productivity, but can they have similar effects on dogs?

Throughout a decent amount of research, essential oils for dogs are a highly sought-out hot topic. Some believe essential oils should not be used on dogs at all, but even more with consistent lists of essential oils that are safe for man’s best friend. Although you must be careful to only use certain oils after consulting with your vet, the answer is yes you can use essential oils on your dog.

Lavender Oil

Lavender oil is a very popular one amongst humans and has been known to help offer a calming effect. The same can be used for your dogs, as lavender is a safe essential oil for pets. This is also a nice and easy oil that can be a good starting point for introducing oils to your dog for the first time.

Lavender oil could be utilized best before a stressful time for your dog, like going to the vet, or even at night time to help your dog settle down a bit if they’re in the mood to do a late-night playtime. Humans will tend to reach for lavender before most of the other oils because of its main role and what it is known for more is its calming effect. Since it is safe for dogs, might as well give it a shot whenever they might be in a stressful state.

Frankincense Oil

Frankincense has been used for ages, including since the time of the ancient Egyptians. And no, this is not to be as potent as the kind that we get in church. Your dog might run for its life if it gets too heavy of a whiff of the good stuff!

Seen as an oil of holistic healing, frankincense oil has been used in a little bit of everything. From lifting spirits after mummification to improving behavior as well as bacterial healing, frankincense is a little less potent essential oil that can be greatly beneficial for your dog.

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Cedar Oil

Cedar oil, also known as cedarwood oil, has a few different benefits for dogs. It can help calm and soothe your pet, but because of its aromatic properties and nature, cedar oil is also great at helping fend off pests and insects. When combined with water, it can also support healthy skin, and might even make your dog a little sleepy.

Although he or she is unable to actually speak, your dog would thank you for using cedar oil if you both find yourselves being outside quite a bit. Whether that is laying on the back patio or going on long walks or hikes, it seems pesky bugs like flies tend to love to annoy dogs. With a little cedar oil around, you can help relieve some of that nuisance so your dog can get back to nap time.

Ginger Oil

Ginger has become more and more popular lately as people have noticed lots of positive outcomes by using it regularly. If your dog happens to be experiencing digestive and stomach problems, then ginger oil may help reduce their discomfort and clear up their issues. It could even help with any joint pain they may have, and some research has suggested that ginger oil could assist in their breathing. From humans to pets, ginger has proven to be a very helpful aid.

Peppermint Oil

Feels like it’s been around since the beginning of time, but it seems we use peppermint for a little bit of everything. From upset stomachs in middle school to cooling effects, peppermint is a reliable source that we continue to go back to. If it’s not broken, don’t fix it, right?

In terms of the benefits peppermint oil can have on your dog, its primary role is the cooling effect it can bring to an overheated dog. Maybe that long hike just made them a bit too warm, so that would be a perfect time to use peppermint oil because it will cool down your dog and get them back to equilibrium. It can also help with any acute injuries that may arise with your furry friend. Having an English Mastiff and English Bulldog, I think this might become a new staple in my house!

Lemongrass Oil

Aside from my bias of loving all things related to the scent and taste of lemon, lemongrass oil has some crucial properties that help make life a little more enjoyable for your dog. Apart from the great, refreshing smell of citrus, lemongrass oil can deter fleas and ticks, giving your dog relief from that pesky nuisance and in turn helping improve your dog’s skin health.

As you might have picked up, the benefits that essential oils can have on humans can easily have the same positive effects on your beloved feline friend. Similarly, with other things that dogs can utilize that humans do, you need to be careful about which oils you incorporate into your dog’s regimen, as not all essential oils are going to be helpful to your dog. Some may even have serious negative side effects.

Citronella Oil

With this particular essential oil, the name really does speak for itself and help with exactly what you think it can help with. Much like the candles that are essential if you are going to be hanging outside in the evenings during the summertime, this special oil helps repel ticks and fleas from your dog. There are companies now that even make shampoo infused with citronella for this exact added benefit.

Chamomile Oil

Ever seen in a commercial or an over-stereotyped romantic comedy where a person is on the couch wrapped up in a cozy blanket sipping chamomile tea? Well, the hype is real and chamomile can have an extremely calming effect on your dog in similar and not so similar ways.

Chamomile oil can help calm down dogs, so if you happily agreed to dog sit your friend’s brand new puppy with all the puppy brains and want it to settle down, some chamomile might just do the trick. If you suspect your loyal sidekick is having a bit of a stomach ache, then chamomile oil can help with that as well.

The one that surprised me was that it (chamomile oil) can actually improve the social skills of your dog. Let’s be honest, not all dogs are outgoing and exactly eager to mingle with other dogs and humans. For those that might be a little on the shy side, chamomile can aid in your dog’s social skills down at your local dog park.

Peace and Calming

This special blend is actually a mixture of 5 different essential oils: Ylang Ylang, Tangerine, Blue Tansy, Orange, and Patchouli Oil Blend. The mix was used recently by a dog owner on her chihuahua because it was hyperactive and would get overly excited with the most basic everyday activities.

The peace and calming oil blend is actually similar to lavender in its calming nature and can be used in any stressful environment, but it will also improve your dog’s confidence. This particular blend seems to work the best if it is diffused or placed on something that will be close to your dogs like a collar or blanket.

Hopefully, this list of essential oils helps you narrow down your selection to make things a bit easier. There is a lot of information out there and you want to make sure you take the necessary steps to keep your dog healthy and not skip a beat.

Could Your Dog Benefit with Essential Oils?

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If you tend to continuously find ways to help improve your dog’s overall health and happiness, you might be wondering if he or she could benefit from something like essential oils. It is a very hot (and rightfully so) trend right now to find things that are more natural and deemed safer than things made with harsh chemicals and agents that have the potential to be extremely harmful to your or your dog.

Finding a healthier way to treat not only ourselves but our dogs as well will help them live a longer and happier life. Below is a list of common signs that might steer you in the direction of investigating if essential oils might be beneficial for your dog:

  • Bad breath
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Parasite
  • Nervousness
  • Anxiety
  • Recent separation
  • Joint problems

There is an abundance of different types of essential oils, all varying in ranges of their own unique properties and benefits. Depending on the types of symptoms that your dog is giving off, it may be worth the time and investment to try a new approach with your pet.

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Essential Oils That Are Toxic to Dogs

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As mentioned before, as great as essential oils seem to be, not all are going to be safe for your dog. Thus, it’s extremely important that you double-check which ones your dog can be around, how to properly apply them, as well as making sure that your vet has approved any new at-home remedies you might be wanting to try.

Below is a list of essential oils that are toxic for dogs and should not be applied topically or even diffused too close around your dog:

  • Pennyroyal oil
  • Pine oil
  • Tea tree oil (melaleuca)
  • Wintergreen oil
  • Cinnamon oil
  • Citrus oil
  • Sweet birch oil
  • Ylang ylang
  • Anise oil
  • Clove oil
  • Juniper oil
  • Yarrow oil

From essential oils to scraps off your dinner plate, it is important to know exactly what your dog can and cannot consume whether that’s orally, topically, or aromatically. The last thing you want is to do something for your pet thinking it will positively help him or her, and then end up having to rush them to the vet due to a bad reaction.

Signs of Essential Oil Poisoning

If you think your dog is having a problem that seems more serious and may have come from essential oil poisoning, then you must get your dog to the vet immediately. Be sure to take the essential oil that you administered and how you applied it so the vet can act accordingly.

Common symptoms of essential oil poisoning:

  • Vomiting
  • Drooling
  • Watery eyes
  • Excessive water around the nose
  • Low body temperature
  • Low heart rate
  • Tremors
  • Unsteady, wobbly, off-balance
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing or excessive panting

Some of these may be a little tougher to decide if they are truly problematic symptoms, but hopefully, you will have been around your dog long enough to know when he or she is just not acting right. If your dog does seem to be acting strange, particularly if you are introducing something new to them (like essential oils), then you will want to keep a watchful eye on how they are progressing. However, if things do not seem to improve or even worsen, then take your pet to the vet immediately.

Applying Essential Oils to Your Dog

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Even though essential oils may seem “safe” and “natural,” that does not mean that they are going to necessarily be healthy. As outlined above, there is an extensive list of oils that would be a bad idea to administer to your dog. Even with the oils that are deemed acceptable to use on pets, the way you apply them should still be done with caution and care. Be sure to consult with a vet before administering essential oils to your dog.

Topical Application

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With topical application of essential oils on dogs, there are some mixed reviews on if you can apply an essential oil directly to your pet or if it must be diluted first. Unless you have been using essential oils on your dog and know its tolerance and how it reacts to the oils, it is probably wise to start with a diluted version with carrier oils just to play it on the safe side.

In terms of actual application, it is recommended that you start with a small test area on your dog’s fur and wait about 15 minutes to see if your dog has any negative reactions to it. If everything seems to be normal, then you can slowly start administering more to your pet. Continue to keep an eye on it and do not apply too much too quickly.

Carrier Oils

To dilute an essential oil, people use what is known as carrier oils, which act as carriers of the oil and help deliver it into the body through the skin. Some of the most common carrier oils used in dilution agents are actually very common household products, but others are going to take a bit more searching:

  • Coconut oil
  • Olive oil
  • Argan oil
  • Jojoba oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Sweet almond oil

These oils play a great role as carriers because they are absorbed better by the skin and some are even natural moisturizers or massage oils.

If you’re going to make your own solution, then you will want to make sure you make a very light solution that won’t be too potent for your pet at the start of trying something new. You will want to go for .25% dilution, which is the equivalent of 1 drop of essential oil for every one and a half tablespoons of the chosen carrier oil.

It may seem like an awful lot to try something (that is considered healthy) on your dog, but not everything good for people is good for dogs, let alone most pets. However, you much rather be safe than sorry when it comes to our canine friends that add endless amounts of goodness to peoples’ lives.

Diffusers

Luckily, diffusers are a bit safer for dogs than direct application onto the fur and skin. Many of us who have diffusers likely put some drops of our desired essential oil into the water base and let it run until it’s out of the water (guilty as charged). When it comes to using it specifically for your dog, you have to use just a bit more caution.

When using a diffuser for your dog, it is recommended that you leave the diffuser running for only 10 minutes before you turn it off. You should then wait 30 minutes to let the room clear out before using it again. And although we all want to believe our dogs to be perfect, they are not. Be sure to have your diffuser on a taller surface so it is less likely to get knocked over or drunk out of.

Especially if your dog is newer to essential oils, it might not be a bad idea to take longer breaks in between each session just to be safe.

Oral Application

It is possible to give your dog essential oils orally, but this is probably the riskiest application of them all. If essential oils can irritate your dog topically, then having them ingest something foreign for the first time is always a risky move. For any desire to give your dog essential oils orally, it is even more imperative to speak with your vet before doing so.

Starting anything new with your pet is always going to have some level of risk, but essential oils are a prime example that just because most people do just fine around most oils does not mean that our pets, and dogs specifically will too.

Safe Alternatives to Essential Oils for Dogs

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Throughout this article, it has been shown that a wide range of essential oils seem to be quite safe for dogs, while others have the potential to be much more problematic. With the reliability of specific essential oils, it can never hurt to have a backup plan just in case your dog does not respond well to the more traditional essential oils.

Hydrosols

Hydrosols are what are also known as “flower waters” and are an effective alternative to essential oils. What makes these hydrosols a safer option is the fact that they are essentially the remains from steam distilling fruits, herbs, and flowers in water. Although they may seem almost identical to essential oils, hydrosols tend to have more subtle aromas that will not irritate your dog’s nose as much.

With these being advised as a safer alternative to essential oils, it is still a good idea to do your own homework and research to make sure you have all the info on what you are getting you and your furry friend into. It may also be worth a visit or call at least your vet to inquire about using this type of aromatherapy on your dog. I am sure they have heard and answered this question plenty of times and will be able to best advise you.

What Are Essential Oils?

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Well now that we’ve talked about them enough, what are essential oils? They seem to be growing in popularity and almost everyone tends to have at least that or a salt lamp somewhere in the house.

In short, essential oils come from concentrated plant materials, which give them their “natural” characteristics and title. From being an air freshener to providing aromatherapy and even being used directly on to the skin, essential oils have become a staple in some cultures and alternative medicine practices. With each essential oil having a very specific set of qualities and properties to it, there is also a very specific benefit that each one can provide. There is definitely some overlap between multiple essential oils, but each one still tends to have at least one characteristic of its own that the others do not.

If you are interested in the more natural and holistic remedies to issues like stress, stomach issues, respiratory issues, or even sleep, then essential oils should be your next stop. Along with the benefits of your body being around and absorbing the oil, there is typically a great smelling aroma to go with it which adds nicely to the overall ambiance.

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Final Thoughts

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The fact of the matter is that all of us dog owners want what is best for our favorite little furry friends and will do just about anything to accomplish that. With that being said, it can be easy to get a little overzealous and jump into something that we have heard or read about that is allegedly safe for our dogs without doing the proper research first. Even with plenty of positive testimonials using essential oils and hydrosols with dogs, it is essential to know all the ins and outs, pros and cons.

Essential oils can be used on dogs and we outline 9 various types of oils that are not only safe but effective with dogs. Throughout all of the research, it seems to be quite the debate on essential oils and dogs. The overall census is that there are safe essential oils, but you want to understand what they are and what they do.

Be sure to do your research, ask some other dog-owning friends of yours, and definitely consult with your vet before you start lathering your dog in essential oil. From there, you will be able to get the proper guidance on how to create the best life possible for your dog!

About Alex Vicente

9 Essential Oils That Are Safe For Dogs // Paws Insider (9)

Dog Lover, Founder & Chief Editor at Paws Insider

I’ve been rescuing dogs since a very early age. I got my first dog when I was 9 years old and I remember how he, out of a litter of 6 puppies, started running towards me. He’d just chosen me. Ever since then, my love for dogs only grows stronger and I want what’s best for them. My mission is to let our readers know about the best products in the market for our best friends, as well as providing guides and tips on how we can take better care of them.

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FAQs

What essential oils can I use for my dog? ›

With so many oils and methods to choose from, here are 8 essential oils for dogs to get you started:
  • Cedar Oil. ...
  • Lavender Oil. ...
  • Lemongrass Oil. ...
  • Citronella Oil. ...
  • Frankincense Oil. ...
  • Peppermint Oil. ...
  • Tangerine, Ylang Ylang, Blue Tansy, Orange & Patchouli Oil Blend (Peace & Calming)

Can I put lavender oil on my dog's paws? ›

Diluted lavender oil is generally considered safe for topical use on dogs. Lavender essential oil is extremely potent. Just like for humans, pure lavender essential oils should not be applied to the skin or ingested. Instead, they should be mixed with a carrier oil.

What essential oils help with dogs itching? ›

When dogs develop allergies, it generally causes itchy and inflamed skin, respiratory disorders, and chronic skin and ear infections. Essential oils such as lavender, chamomile, and peppermint may be used to ease some of these symptoms.

Can I rub peppermint oil on my dog? ›

Peppermint oil is toxic for dogs. Whether you're using an oil diffuser, applying it to their skin, or adding oil to their food, it's unfortunately harmful to our four-legged friends.

What oil is good for dogs coat? ›

While fish oil may be more beneficial when supplementing your dog's diet, some plant-based products work well to soothe dog skin conditions when applied topically. Dr. Krause explains that coconut oil is also a good option for keeping your dog's skin and coat in good shape.

Are any essential oils bad for dogs? ›

Some essential oils are poisonous to dogs. This includes oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang. These oils are toxic whether ingested by mouth or spread on the skin.

What essential oils are safe around pets? ›

This list is not exhaustive:
  • Anise Essential Oil.
  • Basil Essential Oil.
  • Birch Essential Oil.
  • Calendula Essential Oil.
  • Cassia Essential Oil.
  • Cinnamon Essential Oil.
  • Citronella Essential Oil.
  • Clove Essential Oil.
14 Mar 2019

Are orange essential oils safe for dogs? ›

Is Orange Essential Oil Safe for Dogs? Orange essential oil has been used extensively in all species of animals and has GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status.

Where do you apply essential oils on dogs? ›

Topical Application

Apply a diluted essential oil directly to the dog's skin with a cotton swab when treating skin irritations, surface wounds or fungal infections. The oils can also be diluted with water and applied with a spray bottle to mist the area.

What can you use to moisturize your dog's paws? ›

It's not unusual for dogs to have cracked or dry pads. If dogs spend a lot of time on rough surfaces such as concrete runs, they will eventually have thickened pads. Dr. Hammer says, "The best thing to do is rub Vitamin E cream into the pad just like you would if you used hand lotion on your own hands.

Can I put diluted essential oils on my dog? ›

Use topically -- The safest way to use essential oils for dogs is by infusion or topical application. You can either put the diluted oil on your hands and pet your dog, rubbing the oil onto the skin, or mix it into their bath products.

Can I use tea tree oil on my dogs paws? ›

Although products containing low concentrations of tea tree oil are not expected to be a problem in pets, the use of pure tea tree oil directly on the skin is potentially very serious in pets and should never be used. Exposure may cause ataxia, salivation, lethargy, coma and tremor.

What soothes dog itching? ›

Chamomile and Herbal Tea Soaks

Chamomile, calendula, and green tea have properties that soothe and cool irritated skin and reduce inflammation, making them great additions in a dog bath for itchy skin. These soaks are best for dogs who have hot, itchy patches of skin that are at risk of getting rubbed raw.

Can I spray lavender oil on my dog? ›

Properly-prepared, diluted lavender oil is generally considered safe for use topically on dogs. The most common uses of lavender oil for dogs are to soothe itching, irritation, and inflammation. It is relatively versatile, helping dogs with multiple issues, said Sadie Cornelius of CanineJournal.com.

What happens if my dog is exposed to peppermint oil? ›

Peppermint oil is toxic to dogs and can cause mild to severe symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, and even lethargy. Peppermint oil poisoning can be fatal, especially if it's not treated as soon as possible. If you believe your dog has consumed peppermint oil, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

Is Lemongrass safe for dogs? ›

Lemongrass is toxic to dogs due to the cyanogenic glycosides and oils in the plant. Lemongrass poisoning, however, is rare in canines since dogs must ingest large quantities of the plant to trigger severe symptoms.

Is coconut oil safe for dogs? ›

Coconut oil is generally safe for dogs to eat in small amounts or have applied to their skin or fur. When it comes to selecting a brand, virgin coconut oil is best, as most of coconut oil's benefits have been observed with this type.

Is lavender toxic to dogs? ›

First of all, the ASPCA considers lavender to be toxic to dogs (as well as cats and horses). If ingested, the plant can cause nausea, vomiting, and inappetence. These symptoms can be traced to a single dangerous component known as linalool.

Why is eucalyptus bad for dogs? ›

When ingested in sufficient amounts this oil, eucalyptol, is an irritant to the gastrointestinal system, causing discomfort, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is also a neurotoxin and can cause neurological symptoms as well, such as depression, confusion, and seizures.

What essential oils are bad for dogs to smell? ›

Many essential oils, such as eucalyptus oil, tea tree oil, cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, wintergreen, and ylang ylang are toxic to pets. These are toxic whether they are applied to the skin OR used in diffusers.

What essential oil keeps fleas off dogs? ›

5. Make a natural flea repellent by adding six or seven drops of the essential oils of rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, tea tree, and citronella to a cup of water and shaking well. Use a spray bottle to apply the solution to your dog's coat every other day.

Is Cedarwood essential oil safe for dogs? ›

YES, cedar oil is safe for pets and people when used as directed.

Is vanilla essential oil safe for dogs? ›

Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia): Vanilla has comforting and nurturing qualities for dogs who experience nervous tension, irritability, and/or anger. Dogs who have been known to bite are among those who this oil is recommended to. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically.

What scent is toxic to dogs? ›

Many liquid potpourri products and essential oils, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang, are poisonous to dogs. Both ingestion and skin exposure can be toxic.

Is Rosemary safe for dogs? ›

Diced-up dried or fresh rosemary is safe to add to your dog's food or water and can help support heart health and digestion. Be sure to only feed your dog a teaspoon or so as a treat—if your dog accidentally overeats this herb, the side effects may include indigestion and stomach upset.

Is nutmeg essential oil safe for dogs? ›

Oils of Concern

While not an exhaustive list, here are some common essential oils that may cause health concerns in pets: Menthol. Nutmeg, Clove, and Cinnamon oils.

What is the best carrier oil to mix with essential oils for dogs? ›

Essential oils can be diluted in vegetable carrier oils, preferably organic and cold-pressed, such as apricot kernel, coconut, hazelnut, jojoba, olive, sesame, sweet almond, or sunflower oil.

How can I moisturize my dog's paws naturally? ›

Shea Butter – Applying shea butter can soothe and hydrate their dry paws, it can also be useful for hot spots on dogs. Shea Butter is the fat from the nuts that grow on the African shea tree. Its natural ingredient is popularly known for the moisturizing properties.

How can I soothe my dogs irritated paws? ›

Betadine is the very best solution if your pets paws are just irritated. Consider adding chamomile

Can I put coconut oil on my dogs paws? ›

Coconut Oil for Your Dog's Paws

If you find that your pup's paws are dry or cracked, you can use coconut oil to help soothe and heal them. Make sure to rub the coconut oil thoroughly into your dog's paws, or your dog will mistake this treatment for a snack and lick off all of the oil!

Is doTERRA safe for dogs? ›

doTERRA On Guard can be safely diffused in your home around dogs and cats.

Is aloe vera safe for dogs? ›

Aloe Vera is not safe for dogs to ingest, but it is safe to put on their skin. It is important to practice caution when using Aloe Vera. Do not use it internally on your dog or allow your pet to ingest it. If your dog accidentally licks or ingests Aloe Vera, carefully monitor his behavior for potential side effects.

Can I use eucalyptus oil on my dog? ›

Many essential oils, such as eucalyptus oil, tea tree oil, cinnamon, citrus, peppermint, pine, wintergreen, and ylang ylang are straight up toxic to pets. These are toxic whether they are applied to the skin, used in diffusers or licked up in the case of a spill.

How do I mix tea tree oil for my dog? ›

When you use tea tree oil on your dog's skin, dilute it with a lot of water. Take caution with the amount of oil used. As mentioned earlier, the recommended and safest ratio is 0.1-1% strength. At these levels, the weakened concentrate is no longer considered toxic.

What stops itching fast? ›

How to relieve itchy skin
  1. Apply a cold, wet cloth or ice pack to the skin that itches. Do this for about five to 10 minutes or until the itch subsides.
  2. Take an oatmeal bath. ...
  3. Moisturize your skin. ...
  4. Apply topical anesthetics that contain pramoxine.
  5. Apply cooling agents, such as menthol or calamine.

Why does my dog keep licking his paws? ›

Dogs lick their paws as part of self-grooming routines, however excessive licking could be a red flag. While paw licking is a common behaviour, some additional reasons your dog is licking their paw include anxiety, stress, obsessive behaviour, flea allergies or boredom.

Why is my dog so itchy but has no fleas? ›

Dogs Keep Itching Due to Bacterial and Fungal Skin Infections. Dogs who keep itching but don't have fleas or mites are more likely to have a skin infection. These infections may be bacterial or might be fungal. Yeast infections may also be a culprit for some itching in dogs.

What scents are calming to dogs? ›

Because barking and excessive activity are typically signs of stress in shelter dogs — not to mention being undesirable behaviors in the eyes of many adopters — the study concluded that exposure to the odors of vanilla, coconut, valerian, and ginger has the potential to reduce stress in shelter dogs.

How do you make essential oil spray for dogs? ›

Calming Spray
  1. 2 oz witch hazel liquid or vodka.
  2. 2 tsp red turkey oil also called sulfated castor oil.
  3. 5 oz of distilled water.
  4. 3 drops of Roman chamomile essential oil.
  5. 3 drops of Lavender essential oil.
  6. 12 oz spray bottle.

How do you dilute lavender oil for dogs? ›

Before you apply lavender oil to your dog's fur or skin, be sure to properly dilute it first. A safe bet is starting with a single drop of lavender essential oil in 50 drops of carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut, almond or jojoba oil.

Can I rub essential oils on my dog? ›

Don't Use Essential Oils On Skin Or Fur

Your dog has an incredibly powerful sense of smell. This is what makes essential oils so powerful for your dog … and why you should be all the more respectful of your dog's wishes. I don't suggest that you use essential oils on your dog's skin …

What can you use to moisturize your dog's paws? ›

It's not unusual for dogs to have cracked or dry pads. If dogs spend a lot of time on rough surfaces such as concrete runs, they will eventually have thickened pads. Dr. Hammer says, "The best thing to do is rub Vitamin E cream into the pad just like you would if you used hand lotion on your own hands.

Can I use essential oils in my home if I have a dog? ›

In their concentrated form (100%), essential oils can absolutely be a danger for pets. Dogs and cats who have either walked through oils, gotten some on their coat or had oils placed directly on them can develop health concerns. Symptoms include: Unsteadiness on the feet.

What essential oils are safe around pets? ›

This list is not exhaustive:
  • Anise Essential Oil.
  • Basil Essential Oil.
  • Birch Essential Oil.
  • Calendula Essential Oil.
  • Cassia Essential Oil.
  • Cinnamon Essential Oil.
  • Citronella Essential Oil.
  • Clove Essential Oil.
14 Mar 2019

Is lavender toxic to dogs? ›

First of all, the ASPCA considers lavender to be toxic to dogs (as well as cats and horses). If ingested, the plant can cause nausea, vomiting, and inappetence. These symptoms can be traced to a single dangerous component known as linalool.

Is Orange essential oil safe for dogs? ›

Is Orange Essential Oil Safe for Dogs? Orange essential oil has been used extensively in all species of animals and has GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status.

Is orange and lemon essential oil safe for dogs? ›

If used improperly, citrus essential oils may be toxic to your dog. Exposing your dog to concentrated citrus essential oils, for instance, may cause seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, and even make your dog go into a coma. Puppies and senior dogs are also more sensitive to citrus oils.

How can I moisturize my dog's paws naturally? ›

Shea Butter – Applying shea butter can soothe and hydrate their dry paws, it can also be useful for hot spots on dogs. Shea Butter is the fat from the nuts that grow on the African shea tree. Its natural ingredient is popularly known for the moisturizing properties.

How can I soothe my dogs irritated paws? ›

Betadine is the very best solution if your pets paws are just irritated. Consider adding chamomile

Can I put coconut oil on my dogs paws? ›

Coconut Oil for Your Dog's Paws

If you find that your pup's paws are dry or cracked, you can use coconut oil to help soothe and heal them. Make sure to rub the coconut oil thoroughly into your dog's paws, or your dog will mistake this treatment for a snack and lick off all of the oil!

What essential oils are bad for dogs to smell? ›

Many essential oils, such as eucalyptus oil, tea tree oil, cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, wintergreen, and ylang ylang are toxic to pets. These are toxic whether they are applied to the skin OR used in diffusers.

Is Lemongrass safe for dogs? ›

Lemongrass is toxic to dogs due to the cyanogenic glycosides and oils in the plant. Lemongrass poisoning, however, is rare in canines since dogs must ingest large quantities of the plant to trigger severe symptoms.

What happens if dogs lick peppermint oil? ›

Peppermint oil is toxic to dogs and can cause mild to severe symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, and even lethargy. Peppermint oil poisoning can be fatal, especially if it's not treated as soon as possible. If you believe your dog has consumed peppermint oil, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

What essential oil keeps fleas off dogs? ›

5. Make a natural flea repellent by adding six or seven drops of the essential oils of rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, tea tree, and citronella to a cup of water and shaking well. Use a spray bottle to apply the solution to your dog's coat every other day.

Is Cedarwood essential oil safe for dogs? ›

YES, cedar oil is safe for pets and people when used as directed.

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