Can You Drive With A Broken Transfer Case?[Get Quick Solution!] (2023)

Think you have a problem with the transfer case of your vehicle?

Wondering whether can you drive with a broken transfer case? Don’t worry, there’s an answer for all of that.

In this guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know about a broken transfer case and how you can tell when the transfer case needs to be replaced.

Knowing how to fix these problems and how to spot them right away will teach you when you shouldn’t drive.

If you rely too much on a four-wheel drive, knowing this information will come in handy.

Contents

  • 1 What Is A Transfer Case?
  • 2 DIY Guide: How To Fix 3 Common Issues On The Transfer Case
    • 2.1 01. Fluid Leak
      • 2.1.1 What You’ll Need
      • 2.1.2 Raise The Car
      • 2.1.3 Remove The Drive Shaft
      • 2.1.4 Install The New Seal
    • 2.2 02. Small Holes On The Transfer Case
      • 2.2.1 What You’ll Need
      • 2.2.2 Raise The Vehicle
      • 2.2.3 Remove The Bolts
      • 2.2.4 Remove The Front Drive Shaft
      • 2.2.5 Remove The Connector
      • 2.2.6 Remove The Top Of Transfer Case
      • 2.2.7 Install The New Case Half
    • 2.3 03. Encoder Motor Ring
      • 2.3.1 What You’ll Need
      • 2.3.2 Remove The Encoder Motor From The Transfer Case
      • 2.3.3 Mark A Line On The Encoder Motor
      • 2.3.4 Install The New Ring
  • 3 Broken Transfer Case Common Problems Replacement Cost
    • 3.1 Input Seal Replacement
    • 3.2 Transfer Case Half Replacement
    • 3.3 Encoder Motor Ring Replacement
  • 4 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
      • 4.0.1 What happens when a transfer case goes bad?
      • 4.0.2 Can you drive on a bad transfer case?
      • 4.0.3 How much does it cost to replace a transfer case?
      • 4.0.4 What noise does a bad transfer case make?
  • 5 Conclusion

What Is A Transfer Case?

As you might know, four-wheel drive is not always running. In fact, only the back wheels drive the car as the front wheels move freely.

For the four-wheel-drive system to work as you drive, you must press a single button to switch to the four-wheel drive.

But as reliable as the four-wheel-drive system might be, you shouldn’t always have it on.

So, how does the system work? Well, with the help of a transfer case, you can switch back and forth from four-wheel drive to second-wheel drive. Without the transfer case, you wouldn’t be able to use the four-wheel system.

DIY Guide: How To Fix 3 Common Issues On The Transfer Case

Can’t seem to find the culprit that is causing the four-wheel drive to malfunction?

Well, we’ve made a list of some of the most common problems that might cause the vehicle to work poorly when going down the road.

That being said, here are the most common problems that might cause the transfer case to work poorly:

01. Fluid Leak

If you’ve been driving with a broken transfer case, you’ve probably noticed how hard it is to switch to four-wheel drive and how poorly the car performs.

(Video) Can you drive without a front drive shaft? - Removing 4wd front drive shaft - Yukon / Tahoe

If that’s the case, there’s probably an oil leak coming from the transfer case.

Inside the transfer case, you can find a seal that keeps the transmission fluid from getting inside.

However, when this little seal does not work anymore, this fluid will get where it’s not needed. This could damage the transfer case.

So, how can you tell when the seal inside the transfer case has gone bad? Here are a few steps to take:

  • Jack up the vehicle using a floor jack and jack stands
  • Crawl underneath the car and find the transmission case
  • Place a container just underneath the fill plugs
  • Go ahead and pull the fill plugs

If liquid comes out, it means the seal inside the transmission is no longer working, hence why the transmission fluid is coming out.

The only way to fix this annoying issue is by replacing the seal inside the transfer case.Below, we explain how to do so.

What You’ll Need

Before you get started, we suggest using the following tools for this job:

  • A floor jack and jack stands—for this process, you must jack up the vehicle as it’ll make the job a lot easier
  • An impact gun—there are a couple of bolts on the driveshaft you must remove before you can install the new seal
  • A hammer—removing the seal is somewhat hard if you’ve never done it before. Thus, we suggest using a hammer to add that extra strength you need
  • A rag—when you pull out the seal, you must wipe off all the residue inside
  • RTV and oil—to help it seal, you should consider using both RTV and oil. It’s the safest and most reliable way to install a seal
  • 2-inch PCV cap—some people like to use a PCV cap when installing a new seal. It makes it a lot easier when installing the seal. Feel free to skip this one as you can get by without it just fine
  • A marker—you need some sort of way to know where everything goes

Raise The Car

We suggest jacking up the truck every time you need to work on the transfer case;

it just makes everything more manageable since you can easily reach anything you need to work on when you’re underneath the vehicle.

  • Jack up the vehicle and then get underneath the car
  • From there, you want to put the truck in neutral so you can turn the driveshaft
  • Now go ahead and draw a line on the driveshaft so you know where it goes. Without it, you might have a hard time putting it back on

And that’s it for the first part. You can skip the drawing part. But it wouldn’t hurt to draw a simple line.

Remove The Drive Shaft

Here, we will remove the driveshaft. We will also do some cleaning. The cleaning part is necessary as you always want to clean the inside of the seal when you install a new one.

  • Now go ahead and use the impact gun to remove the bolts holding the driveshaft. Once you’ve removed the driveshaft, you want to pull the seal out. With the help of a screwdriver, you’ll be able to remove the seal
  • Put the screwdriver on the backside of the seal, and then tap the screwdriver using a hammer. Now clean all the bulk that has built up on the inside

Install The New Seal

In this section, we’ll be setting the new seal up. Follow these steps to install the seal on your vehicle:

  • Add some oil to the rubber part that goes inside the transfer case, and then add some RTV to the metal part.
  • Next, put the 2-inch PCV cap on the new seal. This way, you’ll be able to fit the new seal. From there, you want to put seal inside and hit it with a hammer until you’ve got it inside
  • And finally, put the driveshaft back on

Would you like to watch a video that covers all the steps we just went through? If so, here is an excellent video that goes through everything you need to know:

02. Small Holes On The Transfer Case

What does a broken transfer case sound like?A transfer case should never make any noise.

(Video) LT230 transfer case. Difficult to get into high and low range. Easy fix!

If you can hear a rattling or humming noise coming from the transfer case, there might be something wrong with it.

For instance, If you’ve recently noticed anything wrong with the four-wheel-drive, it could be the transfer case.

One of the most common things that could cause the transfer case to malfunction is pinholes on the transfer case.

Inside the transfer case, there is a fluid pump that continually moves.

If that were to happen, it would eventually wear out the back of the case. So, to fix this issue, you have to replace the half case.

As a reference: most of the time, the holes can found on top of the transfer case. You might spend some time before you find the little culprit.

If you have some time on hands and feel as though you could replace the case half on your own, follow these steps:

What You’ll Need

For this job, you’re going to need a couple of tools. These tools will allow you to pull the transfer case out and install the new case half. That said, here is what you need:

  • Flathead screwdriver—there is this one tab you need to release, which is why you want the screwdriver
  • Pry Bars—when you’ve pulled the transfer case out, you need pry bars to take the case half out
  • A floor jack and jack stands—as always, the best way to raise a vehicle is by using a floor jack and jack stands
  • A hammer—using a hammer is super useful if you need extra strength to pull something out, which is what you’ll be doing
  • A bucket—when you remove the fill plugs, some liquid might come out of it. So, to avoid making a mess, you need a bucket
  • A 19mm, 18mm, 10mm wrench or impact gun—this goes without saying, but if you want to remove the bolts holding the transfer case, you must use a wrench
  • 15mm socket—there is a bolt-on the transfer case that needs a 15mm socket

Raise The Vehicle

This is the first section on how to replace the case half. To do this, you first have to pull the transfer case out.

  • The first thing you want to do is raise the vehicle and then crawl underneath the car.
  • Next, you want to head over to the transfer case of your vehicle. From there, you need to place a bucket underneath the fill plugs. This way, they won’t make a mess

Remove The Bolts

In this section, you’ll have to remove the bolts from the drive shaft. Once you’ve gotten that out of the way, you must remove the bolts from the transmission cross member.

  • Start by removing the bolts from the driveshaft using the impact gun. But first, disconnect the battery, and put the vehicle in neutral. Once you’ve done that, proceed to pull it out
  • Now, you want to remove the transmission cross member from the truck. You should remove the nuts that hold the transmission to the cross member and then the bolts on each side of the transmission

Remove The Front Drive Shaft

This section is a lot easier than the other ones, as you’ve made a lot of progress so far. There isn’t much left for you to do on the transfer case.

  • Now that we have access to the front shaft, you want to use a wrench to take all the bolts out
  • Next, you want to pull the transmission mount off. But first, you need to remove the bolts using the impact gun

Remove The Connector

The connector you’re about to remove operates the vehicle’s encoder motor, which allows you to switch from two-wheel drive to four-wheel drive.

  • You should now have access to the electrical connector, which you want to remove.Then, release the tab using a flathead screwdriver.
  • Once you’ve removed the tab, you should be able to pull it out. If you’ve never disconnected it before, it might take some time before you can get it off
  • And finally, you need to remove the tube and the nuts that are holding the transfer case together

Remove The Top Of Transfer Case

Here, we’ll do a little bit of tweaking before you can safely remove the transfer case.

  • First and foremost, you want to remove the snap ring grommet from the transfer case
  • Use a 19mm wrench to remove the output shaft speed sensor. From there, you want to remove the factory drain plugs using an 18mm wrench, just in case you haven’t done it already
  • Next, you want to start removing all the bolts from the transfer case. You need a 10mm socket for that. And for the last bolt, you need a 15mm socket
  • Now use pry bars to get in between the transfer case to pull it out. Once you’ve released the top, you want to place your flathead screwdriver inside the speed sensor hole and then slightly lift it up
  • As you’re holding the screwdriver, use your pliers on the shaft snap ring. That should be enough for the top to come right off

Install The New Case Half

Now, you need to install the new case half. For a safe and quick installation, please follow the following steps:

  • Place the new case over the main shaft and align it on the dowels. Make sure it’s squishing down properly when you’ve aligned it on the dowels.
  • Now, you want to tap on the case using a hammer. Like before, use both the flathead screwdriver and the pliers to lock the new case half. Next, you must reinstall all the case bolts as well as the brackets
  • Once you’ve tightened the bolts down, go ahead and reinstall the drain plugs. After that, replace the speed sensor
  • Please make sure the bearing has been correctly installed before installing the output shaft snap ring grommet

And that’s it; you’ve done it. All you need to do now is install the transfer case.

(Video) Repairing Cracked Transfer Case

As you can see, this is somewhat of a challenging job. If you were to do this, we’d suggest calling a friend or someone willing to help you out.

03. Encoder Motor Ring

What is one of the mostcommon symptoms of a broken transfer case?

Another culprit that could cause the transfer case to fail is a damaged encoder motor.

However, sometimes, it might just be the ring inside the encoder motor, which is somewhat easy to replace and less expensive than replacing the whole encoder motor.

To replace the transfer case encoder motor ring, follow these steps:

What You’ll Need

Here are all the tools required for this job:

  • A screwdriver—before you can gain access to the ring inside the encoder motor, you must remove a couple of screws
  • An impact gun—using an impact gun to remove bolts is the easiest way available, which is why you want to use it
  • A marker—before taking the ring off, you must draw a line so that you know where the ring goes

Remove The Encoder Motor From The Transfer Case

First and foremost, you must remove the encoder motor from the transfer case so that you can gain access to the encoder motor ring. That being said, here are the steps you must follow:

  • Remove the bolts from the encoder motor using an impact gun. Once you’ve removed the encoder motor, we suggest placing it on a working table so that you can have an easier time working on it

Mark A Line On The Encoder Motor

When you have removed the encoder motor, you might notice there is a line just in the middle of it.

That line indicates that the encoder motor goes on only one way. If there is no line, we suggest drawing a line to make sure everything realigns.

  • To gain access to the encoder motor ring, you must remove the screws holding the encoder motor together
  • You should now see the encoder ring. As we said earlier, you must draw a line that indicates how the encoder motor goes. You don’t want to leave anything up for guesswork
  • Now that you’ve drawn a line, you want to remove the gear above the ring encoder. But first, you must unplug the wire holding it

Install The New Ring

Here, we’ll install the new ring. Now that you’ve gone through the previous steps, this one should be a walk in the park. That said, follow these steps:

  • Grab the old ring and pull it out. Next, take the replacement and make sure to fit it into place. You can tell how it goes by the tabs. The tabs should be able to fit just fine into the new ring
  • When you’ve installed the new ring, you should hear a clicking sound. That means you got it right
  • Now plug it back in. After that, make sure to line the gear back up. Also, make sure it is aligned according to the line you drew earlier
  • Next, you must place the case back in. From there, make sure to tighten all the screws and bolts you took off

And that’s pretty much it for the installation. That should fix all the annoying issues you’ve been having so far.

If you want to watch a video on this topic, we suggest watching this one:

Broken Transfer Case Common Problems Replacement Cost

Don’t want to fix any of these previous problems on your own and figured it might be best to take it to the dealer?

Well, we got you. Nowadays, it doesn’t take much time to figure out how much money you should pay for something thanks to the internet.

(Video) Old Transfer Case Problems in 88-00 Dodge, Chevy, GMC Trucks and SUVs

Thus, we’ll briefly go over how much money you should pay for some of the most common problems regarding the transfer case.

Input Seal Replacement

One of the most common culprits that cause the transfer case to work poorly is a damaged input seal. Don’t worry, though. It happens quite often.

So, if you were to buy a new input seal replacement, you might find one for about $20.

Of course, that depends on the vehicle you drive. As for the labor cost, the average labor cost is about $500.

Transfer Case Half Replacement

If you’ve noticed pinholes on the case half, you must replace it as soon as possible if you want to prevent further damage to the transfer case.

The average cost for a transfer case half replacement is about $120. The labor cost is about $425.

Encoder Motor Ring Replacement

The average cost for a new encoder motor ring is about $40. And as for the labor cost, you should expect to pay about $450 all the way up to $800.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is there anything you’d like to know about transfer cases? If that’s the case, this section is for you. Here, you’ll find four common questions about transfer cases:

What happens when a transfer case goes bad?

If your transfer case is not working anymore, you won’t be able to use the four-wheel drive.

However, you might be able to drive in 2WD, but we do not suggest doing such a thing as it might be dangerous. Therefore, consider taking the vehicle to the dealer.

Can you drive on a bad transfer case?

Yes, you can drive with a bad transfer case. However, you won’t be able to drive in 4WD. So, avoid driving in bad weather.

How much does it cost to replace a transfer case?

Replacing a transfer case is incredibly expensive. If the transfer case is no longer working, you’re looking at a whopping $2,500 for a replacement. And the labor costs about $500.

What noise does a bad transfer case make?

If you hear grinding noise when you switch to 4WD, there is a high chance that there is something wrong with the transfer case.

Conclusion

So, can you drive with a broken transfer case?Yes, you can drive with a broken transfer case.

However, we’re against the idea of operating a car with a damaged transfer case. It is not safe, and you might cause further damage to the vehicle.

(Video) Cracked Transfer Case Cover Fix

You can, however, still drive in 2WD. Nonetheless, it wouldn’t hurt to take the vehicle to the dealer to have it fixed.

And if you don’t feel like spending money to replace the transfer case or anything that might cause the transfer case to work poorly, you can always try out any of the methods we went through earlier.

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FAQs

Can you still drive with a broken transfer case? ›

Should you drive your car with a bad transfer case? Driving your car with a bad transfer case is a bad idea. If you continue to drive with a transfer case that has a serious mechanical problem, you could destroy it beyond the point of repair, and possibly damage your transmission, driveshafts and axles in the process.

What happens if transfer case breaks? ›

When your transfer case goes bad, your car might jump in and out of 4-wheel drive on its own. This indicates an inability to stay in a drive mode which can damage the transfer case, other systems on the vehicle, or cause an unsafe driving situation.

Do you need a transfer case to drive? ›

While a transfer case is important in all vehicles, it is especially necessary for four-wheel drive vehicles. This component is responsible for transferring power to the back wheels to enhance functionality in four-wheel drive models.

Can I drive with a leaking transfer case? ›

If the seals leak, fluid escapes and cannot properly lubricate the internal components of the transfer case. With time and use the parts inside will wear out and overheat. This can render the transfer case useless and the vehicle will no longer be able to shift into four-wheel drive.

How much does it cost to replace transfer case? ›

The average cost for transfer case replacement is between $2,640 and $2,756. Labor costs are estimated between $441 and $556 while parts are priced at $2,199. This range does not include taxes and fees, and does not factor in your specific vehicle or unique location. Related repairs may also be needed.

Does a transfer case do anything in 2WD? ›

Two-wheel transmissions have no transfer case.

What does a broken transfer case sound like? ›

Strange Grinding, Growling or Humming Noises

If you hear grinding, growling, or humming noises that change with your vehicle speed, it may be coming from the transfer case. This could indicate a low fluid level or some mechanical problem such as bad bearings, loose chains or damaged gears.

Can a transfer case cause transmission problems? ›

Yes, a bad transfer case can damage a vehicle's transmission or transaxle assembly. The transfer case is responsible for transferring power from the engine to the transmission. If the transfer case is not working properly, it can cause the transmission to overheat and fail.

What causes a transfer case to break? ›

The transfer case has sets of seals keeping everything in place. When these seals break or wear out the gears grind on one another causing wear which eventually causes a failure.

How many hours does it take to replace a transfer case? ›

Labor guide says replace front part of transfer case is 5.2 hours, rear part of transfer case 3.0 hours.

What happens if my drive shaft breaks while driving? ›

If your driveshaft breaks while driving, the result would be: Immediate loss of steering. Inability to go forward or backward. Inability to accelerate.

How hard is it to replace a transfer case? ›

Replacing the transfer case will take a couple of hours, and it's a heavy part. It's important to go in knowing exactly what to do and how to do it right. We have some tips for you: To remove the driveshafts, you may want box end wrenches.

Is there a seal between transfer case and transmission? ›

Usually the gaskets between the transmission and the transfer case are known as the transfer case gasket or the transfer case adapter gasket. The gasket may be listed as the type of transfer case and then followed by the words adapter and gasket.

Will a transfer case leak if overfilled? ›

Registered. OK - there's NO pressure in the transfer case ..... so overfilling it (not to the top, obviously!) would not really put any more responsibility on the seals by making them leak.

How long should a transfer case seal last? ›

It is recommended that your transfer case fluid should be changed every 30,000 miles, so your seals should be inspected during this time for any signs of wear.

Can you repair a transfer case? ›

Transfer case parts will eventually wear out and you'll have to make repairs. But properly servicing your transfer case will keep that day as far in the future as possible. The Auto Clinic is committed to providing the very best in automotive maintenance and repair services while providing five-star customer service.

Should I replace transfer case fluid? ›

For proper vehicle maintenance, the transfer case fluid must be changed at regular intervals in order to keep your vehicle operating properly and to prevent excessive wear and/or damage to the transfer case that could lead to internal damage.

Can you weld a cracked transmission case? ›

While a cracked housing may put an end to your day on the trail, it certainly will not put an end to your transmission case. Repairing a crack can be accomplished one of two ways: by TIG welding the crack, or in more severe cases, such as ours, by cutting off the original bellhousing and installing an aftermarket unit.

Does a transfer case turn in 2WD? ›

The transfer case is located between the transmission and front and rear differentials via the driveshafts, creating a two-wheel drive (2WD) or four-wheel drive vehicle. On a four-wheel or all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicle, it directs power to two or four wheels.

Does a transfer case always spin? ›

T-case is always spinning. If you think about it logically, there is no bypass to the rear driveshaft.

Is transfer case only used in 4WD? ›

A transfer case is a specialized component that is used on four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive vehicles. It is essential on vehicles that use both front and rear axles to drive.

Can I drive my truck without a transfer case? ›

Without a transfer case, you will not be able to drive the vehicle since the power is split 50/50 to the front and rear drive shafts and in 4WD or 4H mode. Alternatively 100% of the vehicle power is transferred to the rear drive shaft and differential from the transfer case when 2H mode is selected.

What is the difference between a transfer case and a transmission? ›

The transfer case takes power from the transmission and splits it between output shafts that connect to the front and rear driveshafts. The transfer case is what makes all wheel drive work. Transfer cases are either gear driven or chain driven.

How do you know if you have a bad transfer case? ›

When you're driving a vehicle around with a bad transfer case, your engine computer will usually pick up on the high internal temperatures that the transfer case is producing. This will cause either your vehicle's check engine light or your vehicle's service 4WD light to pop on.

Does a transfer case make noise? ›

Weird Grinding, Growling or Humming Noises

If you hear a grinding, growling, or humming noise that changes with vehicle speed, it might be coming from the transfer case. The root cause could be low fluid level or a mechanical problem, such as a loose chain, bad bearings, or damaged gears.

How often should transfer case fluid be changed? ›

You should have your differential and transfer case fluid checked every 30,000 miles, or when you experience any of the symptoms below. Changing these fluids is a messy job, but your local Brakes Plus team is here to help – we never mind getting our hands dirty!

How do I know if my 4WD is broken? ›

A generally obvious issue is if the 4x4 system just doesn't engage. You can often tell by the way your vehicle is driving if all four wheels are being fed power or not. You may notice jerking motions if you try to engage in 4-wheel drive unsuccessfully.

What happens if I don't replace transfer case? ›

When the transfer case fluid is not replaced for a long time, it may lose its ability to properly lubricate the gears inside. This can lead to premature wear on the transfer case itself, resulting in a potentially expensive repair.

How much does a used transfer case cost? ›

The price for these remanufactured transfer cases varies depending on the make and model of the vehicle, but they usually cost anywhere from $1,000 to over $2,400. Since you'll be getting a remanufactured transfer case no matter what, it's not a bad idea to check around for a better deal on a used piece of equipment.

What does the transfer case sensor do? ›

Just what does the transfer case shift motor do? Whether your 4WD is activated by pressing a button on the dashboard, or you drive a vehicle that automatically shifts to 4-wheel-drive only when sensors indicate it's needed for better traction, it's the transfer case shift motor that makes it happen.

Can I drive my truck without a transfer case? ›

Without a transfer case, you will not be able to drive the vehicle since the power is split 50/50 to the front and rear drive shafts and in 4WD or 4H mode. Alternatively 100% of the vehicle power is transferred to the rear drive shaft and differential from the transfer case when 2H mode is selected.

Why would a transfer case break? ›

Commonly, a transfer case will fail due to a low fluid level caused by leaks, a lack of maintenance or regular wear and tear. It's important to address fluid leaks right away to prevent internal transfer case damage. Changing the transfer case fluid on a regular basis is also important.

Can a transfer case be fixed? ›

Transfer case parts will eventually wear out and you'll have to make repairs. But properly servicing your transfer case will keep that day as far in the future as possible. The Auto Clinic is committed to providing the very best in automotive maintenance and repair services while providing five-star customer service.

What causes cracked transfer case? ›

The most common and general cause of cracked transmission cases is when fluid pipes get damaged. The gear seal on your transmission case is intended to keep the hydraulic fluid from pouring out. However, if it begins to spill due to a shaft seal break, it will create significant transfer and gear shifting issues.

How many hours does it take to replace a transfer case? ›

Labor guide says replace front part of transfer case is 5.2 hours, rear part of transfer case 3.0 hours.

What happens if my drive shaft breaks while driving? ›

If your driveshaft breaks while driving, the result would be: Immediate loss of steering. Inability to go forward or backward. Inability to accelerate.

Is transfer case part of transmission? ›

A transfer case is part of the drive-train (this includes four-wheel drive, all wheel drive, and other multiple powered axle vehicles). Specifically, this mechanism shifts power from the transmission to the front and rear axles with the power of the drive shaft.

Can a transfer case cause transmission problems? ›

Yes, a bad transfer case can damage a vehicle's transmission or transaxle assembly. The transfer case is responsible for transferring power from the engine to the transmission. If the transfer case is not working properly, it can cause the transmission to overheat and fail.

How do I know if my transfer case is broken? ›

Here are some of the most common signs you may encounter when you have a bad transfer case:
  1. Gear Shifting Issues. ...
  2. Difficulty Staying in 4WD. ...
  3. 4WD Will Not Engage/Disengage. ...
  4. Puddle Formation Directly Under the Transfer Case's Location. ...
  5. Weird Grinding, Growling or Humming Noises. ...
  6. 4WD Warning Light Illuminates. ...
  7. 4WD Transfer Case.
26 Apr 2021

What happens if your transfer case has no fluid? ›

Difficulty changing gears – Low or dirty transfer case fluid can affect your transmission's ability to shift gears. It can also result in your car unexpectedly falling out of four-wheel drive. Loud noises while driving – As the transfer case fluid loses its lubricating properties, friction will occur inside.

How much does it cost to get a transfer case rebuilt? ›

How Much Does a Remanufactured Transfer Case Cost? On average, a remanufactured transfer case costs depending on the make and model of your vehicle. The cost of labor to install it is in addition to the price of the unit and will typically run between $400 and $800.

How hard is it to replace a transfer case? ›

Replacing the transfer case will take a couple of hours, and it's a heavy part. It's important to go in knowing exactly what to do and how to do it right. We have some tips for you: To remove the driveshafts, you may want box end wrenches.

How much does a used transfer case cost? ›

The price for these remanufactured transfer cases varies depending on the make and model of the vehicle, but they usually cost anywhere from $1,000 to over $2,400. Since you'll be getting a remanufactured transfer case no matter what, it's not a bad idea to check around for a better deal on a used piece of equipment.

How do you fix a broken transfer case? ›

Fixing a Cracked Transmission Case - YouTube

Should I replace transfer case fluid? ›

For proper vehicle maintenance, the transfer case fluid must be changed at regular intervals in order to keep your vehicle operating properly and to prevent excessive wear and/or damage to the transfer case that could lead to internal damage.

Can you weld a cracked transmission case? ›

While a cracked housing may put an end to your day on the trail, it certainly will not put an end to your transmission case. Repairing a crack can be accomplished one of two ways: by TIG welding the crack, or in more severe cases, such as ours, by cutting off the original bellhousing and installing an aftermarket unit.

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Introduction: My name is Jeremiah Abshire, I am a outstanding, kind, clever, hilarious, curious, hilarious, outstanding person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.