Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (2022)

On this page:

  • What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke?
  • What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes?
  • How can I lower my chances of a heart attack or stroke if I have diabetes?
  • How do doctors diagnose heart disease in people with diabetes?
  • What are the warning signs of heart attack and stroke?

Having diabetesmeans you are more likely to develop heart disease. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain risk factors, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, that increase their chances of having a heart attackor a stroke.

If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar. You can also protect yourself by controlling your high blood pressure and high cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop.

What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke?

High blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vesselsand the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. Over time, this damage can lead to heart disease.1

People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have heart disease or stroke as adults without diabetes.2,3

The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke.

What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes?

Your risk for heart disease is greater if you are male rather than female, whether you have diabetes or not.2 If you do have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke.

Smoking

Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking, because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as

  • lung disease
  • lower leg infections and ulcers
  • foot or leg amputation

High blood pressure

If you have high blood pressure, your heart works harder to pump blood. High blood pressure can strain your heart, damage blood vessels, and increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and eye or kidney problems. Have your blood pressure checked regularly and work with your doctor to control or lower high blood pressure.

Abnormal cholesterol levels

Cholesterol is a type of fat, produced by your liverand found in your blood. You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL.

LDL, often called “bad” cholesterol, can build up and clog your blood vessels. High levels of LDL cholesterol raise your risk of developing heart disease. HDL is sometimes called “good cholesterol.” Higher levels of HDL is linked to lower risk for heart disease and stroke. To improve LDL and HDL levels, limit the amount of fat in your eating plan, eat more plant-based foods, and get regular physical activity.

Another type of blood fat, triglycerides, also can raise your risk of heart disease when the levels are higher than recommended by your health care team.

(Video) The connection between diabetes and heart disease and stroke

Obesity and belly fat

Being overweight or having obesitycan make it harder to manage your diabetes and raise your risk for many health problems, including heart disease and high blood pressure. If you are overweight, a healthy eating planwith fewer calories and more physical activity often will lower your blood glucose levels and reduce your need for medicines.

Excess belly fat around your waist, even if you are not overweight, can raise your chances of developing heart disease.

You have excess belly fat if your waist measures

  • more than 40 inches and you are a man
  • more than 35 inches and you are a woman

Chronic kidney disease

Heart disease is closely linked with chronic kidney disease, a condition in which your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood the way they should. Having diabetes is a risk factor for developing kidney disease, which affects about 40% of people with diabetes. Other risk factors for developing kidney disease are high blood pressure and a family history of kidney failure.

If you have risk factors, get tested for kidney disease and protect your kidneys by making healthy food choices, being more active, aiming for a healthy weight, and managing health conditions that cause kidney damage.

Family history of heart disease

A family history of heart disease may add to your chances of developing the condition. If one or more of your family members had a heart attack before age 50, you have double the chance of developing heart disease compared with people who have no family history of the disease.4

You can’t change whether heart disease runs in your family. But if you have diabetes, it’s even more important to take steps to protect yourself from heart disease and decrease your chances of having a stroke.

How can I lower my chances of a heart attack or stroke if I have diabetes?

Taking care of your diabetes is important to help you protect your heart. You can substantially lower your chances of having a heart attack or stroke by taking the following steps to keep your heart and blood vessels healthy.5

Manage your diabetes ABCs

Know your diabetes ABCs to help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stop smoking if you have diabetes to lower your chances of developing heart disease.

A is for the A1C test. The A1C testshows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. This is different from the blood glucose checks you do every day. The higher your A1C number, the higher your blood glucose levels have been during the past 3 months. High levels of blood glucose can harm your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes.

The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7%. Some people may do better with a slightly higher A1C goal. Your A1C goals may also change as you get older and your lifestyle changes. Ask your health care team what your goal should be.

B is for blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of your blood against the wall of your blood vessels. If your blood pressure gets too high, it makes your heart work too hard. High blood pressure can cause a heart attack or stroke and damage your kidneys and eyes.

(Video) Take Diabetes to Heart: Linking Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be.

C is for cholesterol. A buildup of cholesterol, a form of fat found in your blood, can cause a heart attack or stroke. Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years old, you may need to take medicine, such as a statin, to lower your cholesterol levels and protect your heart. Some people with very high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol may need to take medicine starting at a younger age.

Learn about getting your cholesterol checked.

S is for stop smoking. Quitting smoking is especially important for people with diabetes because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels, so your heart has to work harder. E-cigarettes aren’t a safe option either.

If you quit smoking

  • you will lower your risk for heart attack; stroke; nerve, kidney, and eye disease; and amputation
  • your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels may improve
  • your blood circulation will improve
  • you may have an easier time being physically active

If you smoke or use other tobacco products, stop. Ask for help so you don’t have to do it alone. You can start by calling the National Quitline at 1-800-QUITNOW or 1-800-784-8669. For tips on quitting, go to Smokefree.gov.

Ask your health care team about your goals for A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol, and what you can do to reach these goals. To improve your diabetes self-management skills, you may want a referral to a diabetes educator or a registered dietitian. Medicare, some private insurers, and other organizationswill provide financial assistance for some of these services.

You can keep track of your ABCs with a diabetes record form. You can use it when you meet with your health care team in person or remotely. Talk with your team about your goals and how you are doing, and whether you need to make any changes to your diabetes care plan.

Develop or maintain healthy lifestyle habits

Healthy lifestyle habits that you stick with can help you manage your diabetes and prevent heart disease.

  • Follow your healthy eating plan.
  • Make physical activity part of your routine.
  • Stay at or get to a healthy weight.
  • Get enough sleep.

Learn more about these tips to manage diabetes.

Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (1)Develop or maintain healthy lifestyle habits. Physical activity can help you manage your diabetes and may help you cope with stress.

Watch a video about what you can do to keep your heart healthy.

(Video) Diabetes: Risk for Heart Attack and Stroke

Learn about the Body Weight Planner, which may help you create a personal plan to reach your goal weight.

Learn to manage stress

Managing diabetes is not always easy. Feeling stressed, sad, lonely, or angry is common when you are living with diabetes. You may know what to do to stay healthy but may have trouble sticking with your plan over time. Long-term stress can raise your blood glucose and blood pressure, but you can learn ways to lower your stress. Try deep breathing, gardening, taking a walk, doing yoga, talking with a loved one, working on a hobby, or listening to your favorite music. Learn more about healthy ways to cope with stress.

Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (2)Yoga and other forms of exercise can help reduce stress.

Take medicine to protect your heart

Medicines may be an important part of your treatment plan. Your doctor will prescribe medicine based on your specific needs. Medicine may help you

  • meet your A1C (blood glucose), blood pressure, and cholesterol goals.
  • reduce your risk of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke.
  • treat angina, or chest pain that is often a symptom of heart disease. Angina can also be an early symptom of a heart attack.
  • treat heart failure, which is a form of heart disease in which your heart cannot pump blood well enough for your body to work properly.

Ask your doctor whether you should take daily aspirin. Aspirin is not safe for everyone. Your doctor can tell you whether taking aspirin is right for you and exactly how much to take.

Statins can reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke in some people with diabetes. In addition, certain diabetes medicines have been shown to reduce the risk of heart attacks and death in patients at very high risk of having a heart attack. Talk with your doctor to find out whether taking a statin or a diabetes medicine that reduces heart attack risk is right for you.

Take medicines the way your doctor or health care team tells you to. Talk with your doctor or pharmacistif you have questions about your medicines. Before you start a new medicine, ask your doctor about possible side effects and how you can avoid them. If the side effects of your medicine bother you, tell your doctor. Don’t stop taking your medicines without checking with your doctor first.

Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (3)Take medicines as prescribed.

How do doctors diagnose heart disease in people with diabetes?

Doctors diagnose heart disease in people with diabetes based on their

  • symptoms
  • medical and family history
  • how likely they are to have heart disease
  • a physical exam
  • results from tests and procedures

Tests used to monitor your diabetes—A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol—help your doctor decide whether it is important to do additional tests to check your heart health or to refer you to a specialist such as a cardiologist.

Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (4)Your health care professional will do a physical exam.

Ask your health care team these questions.

(Video) Coronary Artery Disease and Diabetes

  • What can we do to lower my chances of getting heart disease?
  • How can we work together to help me maintain my goals for A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol?
  • What medicines, such as aspirin or a statin, will help protect my heart?
  • Are there diabetes medicines that will help protect my heart?

What are the warning signs of heart attack and stroke?

Call 9-1-1 right away if you have any of these warning signs of a heart attack

  • pain or pressure in your chest that lasts longer than a few minutes or goes away and comes back
  • pain or discomfort in one or both of your arms or shoulders, or your back, neck, or jaw
  • shortness of breath
  • sweating or light-headedness
  • indigestion or nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • feeling very tired

Treatment works best when it is given right away. Warning signs can be different in different people. You may not have all the listed symptoms.

Women may experience chest pain, nausea, and vomiting; feel very tired (sometimes for days); and have pain that spreads to the back, neck, throat, arms, shoulders, or jaw. People with diabetes-related nerve damagemay not notice any chest pain.

If you have angina, it’s important to know how and when to seek medical treatment.

Call 9-1-1 right away if you have any of these warning signs of a stroke, including sudden

  • weakness or numbness of your face, arm, or leg on one side of your body
  • confusion, or trouble talking or understanding
  • dizziness, loss of balance, or trouble walking
  • trouble seeing out of one or both eyes
  • sudden, severe headache

If you have any one of these warning signs, call 9-1-1. You can help prevent permanent damage by getting to a hospital within an hour of a stroke.

Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke | NIDDK (5)Call 9-1-1 if you have the warning signs of a heart attack or stroke. Treatment works best when given right away.

Clinical Trials for Diabetes, Heart Disease, & Stroke

The NIDDK conducts and supports clinical trials in many diseases and conditions, including diabetes. The trials look to find new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease and improve quality of life.

What are clinical trials for diabetes, heart disease, and stroke?

Clinical trials—and other types of clinical studies—are part of medical research and involve people like you. When you volunteer to take part in a clinical study, you help doctors and researchers learn more about disease and improve health care for people in the future.

Researchers are studying many aspects of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, such as

  • risk factors for heart disease and stroke in specific populations, such as Black Americans with diabetes
  • improved imaging techniques and tests to help diagnose and treat conditions that lead to heart attacks and stroke
  • the role of genetics in diabetes, heart disease, and stroke

Find out if clinical studies are right for you.

Watch a video of NIDDK Director Dr. Griffin P. Rodgers explaining the importance of participating in clinical trials.

(Video) Cardiology: Diabetes and Heart Disease

What clinical trials for heart disease and stroke are looking for participants?

You can view a filtered list of clinical studies on diabetes and heart disease that are federally funded, open, and recruiting at www.ClinicalTrials.gov. A separate list of clinical studies on diabetes and stroke is also available at www.ClinicalTrials.gov. You can expand or narrow the list to include clinical studies from industry, universities, and individuals; however, the National Institutes of Health does not review these studies and cannot ensure they are safe. Always talk with your health care provider before you participate in a clinical study.

References

FAQs

How does diabetes cause heart disease and stroke? ›

Adults with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or a stroke as people who do not have diabetes. Over time, high blood sugar from diabetes can damage blood vessels in the heart and block blood vessels leading to the brain, causing a stroke. More than 2 in 3 people with diabetes have high blood pressure.

Which are the main reason of diabetes and heart disease answer? ›

Smoking. Being overweight or having obesity. Not getting enough physical activity. Eating a diet high in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, and sodium (salt)

How does diabetes affect the risk of heart disease and stroke? ›

Having diabetes means you are more likely to develop heart disease. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain risk factors, such as high blood pressure link or high cholesterol, that increase their chances of having a heart attack or a stroke.

How do I lower my Qrisk score? ›

Improving your diet, stopping smoking, reducing your alcohol intake, reducing your weight and taking more exercise can help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.

How can you prevent heart disease and stroke? ›

Healthy diet, regular physical activity, and not using tobacco products are the keys to prevention. Checking and controlling risk factors for heart disease and stroke such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and high blood sugar or diabetes is also very important.

What are the main causes of stroke? ›

Some of the most important treatable risk factors for stroke are:
  • High blood pressure, or hypertension. Hypertension is by far the most potent risk factor for stroke. ...
  • Cigarette smoking. ...
  • Heart disease. ...
  • Warning signs or history of TIA or stroke. ...
  • Diabetes. ...
  • Cholesterol imbalance. ...
  • Physical inactivity and obesity.
25 Jul 2022

Why do diabetics have silent heart attacks? ›

Dr. Soliman says silent heart attacks are a particular concern for people with diabetes. High blood sugar, high blood pressure and cholesterol problems raise risk for heart events, but nerve damage can make warning signs of an attack impossible to feel.

Can diabetes cause a stroke? ›

Diabetes is a well-established risk factor for stroke. It can cause pathologic changes in blood vessels at various locations and can lead to stroke if cerebral vessels are directly affected. Additionally, mortality is higher and poststroke outcomes are poorer in patients with stroke with uncontrolled glucose levels.

What is normal sugar level by age? ›

From 90 to 130 mg/dL (5.0 to 7.2 mmol/L) for adults. From 90 to 130 mg/dL (5.0 to 7.2 mmol/L) for children, 13 to 19 years old. From 90 to 180 mg/dL (5.0 to 10.0 mmol/L) for children, 6 to 12 years old. From 100 to 180 mg/dL (5.5 to 10.0 mmol/L) for children under 6 years old.

Does diabetes cause heart failure? ›

Diabetic patients have an increased risk of developing heart failure because of the abnormal cardiac handling of glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), and because of the effect of the metabolic derangements of diabetes on the cardiovascular system.

What are the symptoms of diabetes heart disease? ›

If you have prediabetes or type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should be aware of the symptoms of heart disease, including:
  • Chest pain, also known as angina, including feelings of chest tightness or pressure.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Fainting or near fainting.
  • Fluttering in your chest.

How does diabetes affect the brain? ›

Hyperglycemia and the Brain

High blood sugar over time damages blood vessels in the brain that carry oxygen-rich blood. When your brain receives too little blood, brain cells can die. This is called brain atrophy and can cause problems with memory and thinking and eventually can lead to vascular dementia.

What is considered dangerously high cholesterol? ›

A person is considered at high risk for developing heart disease if their total cholesterol level is higher than 240 mg/dL, LDL levels are higher than 160 mg/dL (190 mg/dL is even higher risk), and if the HDL level is below 40 mg/dL.

Should you take a statin or not? ›

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends low- to moderate-dose statins in adults ages 40 to 75 who have one or more risk factors for heart and blood vessel disease and at least a 1 in 10 chance of having a cardiosvascular disease event in the next 10 years.

What is a normal QRISK score? ›

Low risk – QRISK2 score of less than 10%

This means that you have less than a one in ten chance of having a stroke or heart attack in the next 10 years.

Can drinking water prevent heart attacks? ›

Drink water before bed

A study in the American Journal of Medical Epidemiology found that participants who drink five or more glasses of plain water per day have a lower risk for fatal coronary heart disease, compared to those who drink less than two glasses per day.

What foods prevent stroke? ›

Foods high in potassium, such as sweet and white potatoes, bananas, tomatoes, prunes, melon and soybeans, can help you maintain a healthy blood pressure — the leading risk factor of stroke. Magnesium-rich foods, such as spinach, are also linked to a lower risk of stroke.

What foods reduce heart disease? ›

The best diet for preventing heart disease is one that is full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, poultry, and vegetable oils; includes alcohol in moderation, if at all; and goes easy on red and processed meats, refined carbohydrates, foods and beverages with added sugar, sodium, and foods with trans ...

What foods can trigger a stroke? ›

Eating steaks, sausages, and other red meats high in saturated fat could lead to a stroke. An elderly person who eats red meat is more likely to have an ischemic stroke because saturated fat causes blockages in blood vessels that supply blood to the brain.

Can stress cause a stroke? ›

Stress can cause the heart to work harder, increase blood pressure, and increase sugar and fat levels in the blood. These things, in turn, can increase the risk of clots forming and travelling to the heart or brain, causing a heart attack or stroke.

What are 6 foods that prevent stroke? ›

Here are some of the best foods that help prevent stroke:
  • Oatmeal (for whole grains) ...
  • Yogurt (for probiotics) ...
  • Dry Beans (for fiber) ...
  • Onions (for antioxidants) ...
  • Flaxseeds (for fatty acids) ...
  • Red wine (for antioxidants) ...
  • Salmon (for vitamin D)
18 Aug 2020

Can insulin damage your heart? ›

The new study, led by Abel and Kevin Xiang at UC Davis, shows that too much insulin in the blood (hyperinsulinemia) contributes to heart failure by triggering a molecular chain reaction that damages heart muscle cells.

Does type 2 diabetes cause heart problems? ›

In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are more than twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes.

Can sugar cause heart attacks? ›

"The effects of added sugar intake — higher blood pressure, inflammation, weight gain, diabetes, and fatty liver disease — are all linked to an increased risk for heart attack and stroke," says Dr.

What blood sugar level causes stroke? ›

A fasting blood glucose (sugar) level of 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or higher is dangerous. People who have diabetes are 2 times as likely to have a stroke compared to people who do not have diabetes.

What does a diabetic stroke feel like? ›

The symptoms of a diabetic stroke are the same as for any stroke. They include problems with speech, a sudden and severe headache, weakness or numbness on one side of the body, confusion, dizziness, loss of balance, and vision problems.

Can you recover from a stroke? ›

Recovery time after a stroke is different for everyone—it can take weeks, months, or even years. Some people recover fully, but others have long-term or lifelong disabilities. Learn more about stroke rehabilitation from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke .

What is a normal blood sugar for a 70 year old? ›

Normal ranges of blood sugar levels are between 70 and 130 mg/dL before eating meals. The American Diabetes Association recommends seniors have blood glucose levels of less than 180 mg/dL two hours after eating. Not every senior has the same care needs, which means they don't all need the same type of at-home care.

Is coffee good for diabetics? ›

Some studies suggest that drinking coffee — whether caffeinated and decaffeinated — may actually reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels.

What is normal A1c for a 70 year old? ›

The key measure of diabetes control is hemoglobin A1c. For healthy over 65ers with long life expectancy, the target should be 7.0 – 7.5%.

Can diabetes cause sudden death? ›

Impairment of tissue insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes is a significant factor for sudden cardiac death. The complex pathophysiology stems from coexisting cardiovascular disease and complications of impaired tissue sensitivity to insulin.

How long can you live with congestive heart failure and diabetes? ›

Although there have been recent improvements in congestive heart failure treatment, researchers say the prognosis for people with the disease is still bleak, with about 50% having an average life expectancy of less than five years. For those with advanced forms of heart failure, nearly 90% die within one year.

Can diabetes damage heart be reversed? ›

It is possible to reverse the detrimental effects of diabetes on risk of heart disease, in particular. However, that's probably a long-term aim, because the problems that diabetes causes to the cardiovascular system take years to develop.” Taking this long-term outlook involves permanent lifestyle changes.

What does it feel like when your blood sugar is too high? ›

Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) means there is too much sugar in the blood because the body lacks enough insulin. Associated with diabetes, hyperglycemia can cause vomiting, excessive hunger and thirst, rapid heartbeat, vision problems and other symptoms. Untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious health problems.

How do I know if my heart is OK? ›

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a test that records the electrical activity of the heart. The ECG reflects what's happening in different areas of the heart and helps identify any problems with the rhythm or rate of your heart. The ECG is painless and takes around 5-10 minutes to perform.

Can diabetes be cured? ›

Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels.

Does diabetes affect memory? ›

How Does Diabetes Affect Memory Loss? Uncontrolled diabetes may increase the risk of experiencing cognitive problems, such as memory loss. Higher than normal blood glucose levels can damage nerve cells, supportive glial cells, and blood vessels in both peripheral nerves of the body and the brain.

Can diabetes change your personality? ›

Feeling a range of highs and lows is not uncommon if you have diabetes. Your blood sugar impacts how you feel and can contribute to mood swings. Poor management of blood glucose can lead to negative moods and a lower quality of life .

Can diabetes cause mental illness? ›

People with type 1 diabetes are at a heightened risk for mental health issues, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety, and disordered eating. However, these are all treatable disorders. It is important to pay attention to your feelings about having diabetes or taking care of someone who has diabetes.

Does rice raise cholesterol? ›

Although rice does not contain cholesterol, it can affect the body in a way that may raise someone's cholesterol levels or triglycerides. In addition, there are several factors to consider to determine if rice can cause an individual to develop high cholesterol. These include: the type of rice someone eats.

Do eggs raise cholesterol? ›

Answer From Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. Chicken eggs are an affordable source of protein and other nutrients. They're also naturally high in cholesterol. But the cholesterol in eggs doesn't seem to raise cholesterol levels the way some other foods, such as those high in trans fats and saturated fats, do.

What are the signs of high cholesterol in your feet? ›

thinning, paleness, or shininess on the skin of your legs and feet. tissue death caused by lack of blood supply, called gangrene. ulcers on your legs and feet that don't heal or heal very slowly. leg pain that doesn't go away when at rest.

What can I take instead of statins to lower cholesterol? ›

7 cholesterol-lowering alternatives to statins
  • Fibrates. Mostly used for lowering triglyceride levels in patients whose levels are very high and could cause pancreatitis. ...
  • Plant stanols and sterols. ...
  • Cholestyramine and other bile acid-binding resins. ...
  • Niacin. ...
  • Policosanol. ...
  • Red yeast rice extract (RYRE) ...
  • Natural products.

Why do doctors push statins? ›

Statins are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S. for a reason: They can lower your LDL (low-density lipoproteins) cholesterol (the “bad cholesterol”) by 25% to 50% or more, depending on the specific statin and dose. Statins are also helpful in lowering the risk of heart attack and stroke.

What are the negatives of taking statins? ›

What are statin side effects?
  • Muscle pain and damage. One of the most common complaints of people taking statins is muscle pain. ...
  • Liver damage. Occasionally, statin use could cause an increase in the level of enzymes that signal liver inflammation. ...
  • Increased blood sugar or type 2 diabetes. ...
  • Neurological side effects.

What is a good cardiac risk score? ›

Low: Less than a 5% risk. Borderline: A 5% to 7.4% risk. Intermediate: A 7.5% to 19.9% risk. High: More than a 20% risk.

When should you start taking statins? ›

For adults aged 40 to 75 years who have 1 or more cardiovascular risk factors (ie, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, or smoking) and an estimated 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of 10% or greater: Initiate a statin.

What is a cardiovascular disease 10-year risk score? ›

low – you have less than a 10% chance of a heart or circulation problem in the next 10 years. moderate – you have a 10% to 20% chance of a heart or circulation problem in the next 10 years. high – you have more than a 20% chance of a heart or circulation problem in the next 10 years.

Why do diabetics have silent heart attacks? ›

Dr. Soliman says silent heart attacks are a particular concern for people with diabetes. High blood sugar, high blood pressure and cholesterol problems raise risk for heart events, but nerve damage can make warning signs of an attack impossible to feel.

Can too much sugar cause a stroke? ›

Diabetes means you have too much sugar in your blood. This can increase the risk of a stroke, because having too much sugar in your blood damages the blood vessels. High blood sugar levels can: Make blood vessels become stiff.

How much does diabetes increase risk of heart disease? ›

People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely than others to develop cardiovascular disease. Because this risk is so high, cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death in people with diabetes.

Does sugar cause heart disease? ›

Eating too much added sugar increases the risk of dying with heart disease. A sugar-laden diet may raise your risk of dying of heart disease even if you aren't overweight. So says a major study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

What kind of food should diabetics avoid? ›

Worst Choices
  • Fried meats.
  • Higher-fat cuts of meat, such as ribs.
  • Pork bacon.
  • Regular cheeses.
  • Poultry with skin.
  • Deep-fried fish.
  • Deep-fried tofu.
  • Beans prepared with lard.
6 Dec 2020

Do diabetics feel heart attacks? ›

Diabetes can affect your nerves and make heart attacks painless or “silent.” A silent heart attack means that you may not have any warning signs, or they may be very mild. Your health care provider might need to do special tests to see whether you've had a heart attack.

What are the symptoms of diabetes heart disease? ›

If you have prediabetes or type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should be aware of the symptoms of heart disease, including:
  • Chest pain, also known as angina, including feelings of chest tightness or pressure.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Fainting or near fainting.
  • Fluttering in your chest.

What foods can trigger a stroke? ›

Eating steaks, sausages, and other red meats high in saturated fat could lead to a stroke. An elderly person who eats red meat is more likely to have an ischemic stroke because saturated fat causes blockages in blood vessels that supply blood to the brain.

Can drinking water help prevent a stroke? ›

Drink a lot of water: You should drink at least five glasses of water per day, and this will reduce your risk of stroke by 53%, according to a recent study by Loma Linda University.

What are the 5 warning signs of a stroke? ›

Call 9-1-1 immediately if any of these signs of stroke appear: Numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg; Confusion or trouble speaking or understanding speech; Trouble seeing in one or both eyes; Trouble walking, dizziness, or problems with balance; severe headache with no known cause.

What is the average lifespan of someone with diabetes? ›

Several other studies have shown shortened life expectancies for people living with diabetes, but years vary. A 2001 study found that people with type 1 diabetes lived an average of 59.7 years when diagnosed under age 30 and with the start of insulin treatment within 12 months of diagnosis.

Can diabetes damage heart be reversed? ›

It is possible to reverse the detrimental effects of diabetes on risk of heart disease, in particular. However, that's probably a long-term aim, because the problems that diabetes causes to the cardiovascular system take years to develop.” Taking this long-term outlook involves permanent lifestyle changes.

Can metformin cause heart problems? ›

Many antihyperglycemic drugs can increase the risk of heart failure. However, it is commonly believed that metformin - the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes - reduces the risk of and improves the clinical course of heart failure. It is estimated that 20-25% of patients taking metformin have heart failure.

What is the number 1 cause of heart disease? ›

A buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries (atherosclerosis) is the most common cause of coronary artery disease. Risk factors include a poor diet, lack of exercise, obesity and smoking. Healthy lifestyle choices can help lower the risk of atherosclerosis.

What happen when you stop eating sugar? ›

When you stop eating sugar, you're likely to find you're far healthier and less likely to catch a cold or flu bug. One reason for this has to do with your white blood cells. For up to 5 hours after you've eaten a bunch of sugar, those cells are 50% less able to fight off bad bacteria.

Videos

1. Heart Disease and Diabetes
(National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK))
2. Diabetes and Heart Disease: Healthy Eating with Diabetes
(OHSU)
3. Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention
(My Doctor - Kaiser Permanente)
4. Woman Take Heart - Battling Heart Disease & Stroke
(Veterans Health Administration)
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