Does My Spouse’s Credit Score Affect Mine? (2022)

Does My Spouse’s Credit Score Affect Mine? (1)

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Your credit score won't be affected by simply marrying someone with good or bad credit, but there are scenarios where their credit behavior can affect your credit score and your ability to get a mortgage.

Tying the knot often means tying your finances to your spouse's. And while there isn't a direct link between your spouse's credit score and your credit score -- you won't have bad credit just because your spouse does -- there are some cases where bad credit management by one spouse can negatively affect the credit score of the other spouse.

Below, I'll explain the ins and outs of credit scores, ways in which your spouse's credit can affect yours, and how your spouse's credit can affect your personal finances in ways beyond just your credit score.

(Video) Does My Spouse`s Bad Credit Affect Mine?

Intro to credit scores

The way to think about credit scores is that they are a "grade" based on the information in your credit report. Credit scoring companies look at what's on your credit report, and based on that information -- your payment history, your existing balances, credit mix, and so on -- they calculate a numerical value. A FICO® Score can range from 300 to 850, with higher numbers being better.

Here's a quick guide to the five parts of your credit score:

  • Payment history (35% of your score) -- Do you always pay your bills on time? It's really that simple. Your most recent payment history will have more impact than old payment history. For example, a 30-day late payment that happened five years ago won't matter much at all, but a 30-day late payment three months ago can be devastating to your credit.
  • Credit utilization (30%) -- This is based on how much credit you've used as a percentage of how much credit you could use. If you have a $1,000 balance on a $5,000 credit card, and it's your only financial account, then your credit utilization is 20%, which is just fine. Using more than 30% of your credit limits is a warning sign to lenders, and can harm your credit score.
  • Length of credit history (15%) -- Someone who has 15 years of perfect credit history is probably a better risk than someone who has just six months of perfect credit history.
  • New credit (10%) -- Applying for a large number of loans or credit accounts in a short period of time can hurt your credit score because it's something people often do when they are having financial problems that haven't yet shown up in their credit reports.
  • Types of credit (10%) -- Having a mix of revolving accounts (credit cards) and installment debt (mortgages, car loans, personal loans, etc.) is better than having just one type of account, but this factor isn't that important, and you shouldn't borrow money just to get a different type of account on your credit report.

Credit scores are ultimately designed to measure the risk that you will fail to make payments on time or at all, and it's something credit scores do really well. All else equal, someone with a 750 credit score is much less likely to default on a loan than someone with a 600 credit score.

Does your spouse affect your credit score?

Your spouse's ability to manage his or her credit can affect your credit score, but only if you have shared accounts in one way or another. For example, many couples have credit cards, car loans, or mortgages on which they are joint borrowers, meaning they are both responsible for making payments.

If you have a joint credit account with your spouse, and he or she fails to make on-time payments, the late payments will appear on both of your credit reports. Naturally, these late payments would also harm both of your credit scores.

Even if you aren't late on a bill, a joint account can still hurt your credit score if it isn't optimally managed. For example, you and your spouse might be jointly responsible for a credit card account with a $5,000 limit. If from month to month you carry a balance of $3,000 on it, you'll have used 60% of available credit on the account, which negatively affects your credit score. Ideally, balances shouldn't be higher than 30% of the credit limit at any point in time.

(Video) Does My Spouse's Credit Score Matter

Finally, your spouse's credit can also affect your credit if you are an authorized user on their credit cards. When you are an authorized user on someone else's credit account, all of the history associated with that account is imported into your credit report. If they failed to make on-time payments in the past, or keep high balances on that account, it could negatively affect your credit report and score.

Luckily, you can easily remove a spouse as an authorized user on a credit card account. We've also seen data points that suggest the authorized user can request a deletion of the record from their credit reports with relatively high success. Unfortunately, this "trick" does not apply to accounts where you are joint borrowers, however. A joint borrower is legally responsible for paying on any balances whereas an authorized user has no such responsibility.

How a spouse's bad credit can affect you besides credit scores

Even if your spouse's credit behavior doesn't directly affect your credit score because you don't have shared accounts, it can affect you in other ways, particularly when it comes to borrowing large amounts of money to buy homes or cars.

Your spouse's credit matters a lot when it comes time to buy a home. That's because many married couples buy a home based on what they can afford with their combined incomes. However, if one person has bad credit, applying together to get the benefit of both incomes may not outweigh the downside of having the lender look at both spouses' credit scores.

Here's how this works: Lenders use what's known as the "lower middle score" rule for large loans like mortgages. A lender looks at all three credit scores of each applicant, and uses the lower of the middle scores to determine how to price the loan, and whether to go through with the loan in the first place.

It sounds more complicated than it is. Here's an example to set it all straight.

(Video) Does your spouse's credit impact your credit score?

Let's suppose Sally and Frank are married and want to buy a home together, and their credit scores are as follows:


We first need to find the middle score for each applicant. Sally has excellent credit scores, with a middle score of 801. Frank's middle score is 689. Lenders will use the lower of these two middle scores to determine the rate and terms for the mortgage. In this case, Frank's middle score of 689 would be the one they use.

This can be a big problem for some couples. On one hand, applying together allows Sally and Frank to leverage their combined incomes on an application. Two incomes is almost always better than one, so being able to put down their combined income on an application should theoretically allow them to borrow more money.

On the other hand, because Sally and Frank are applying together, Frank's bad credit will weigh heavily on their application. In this scenario, the best possible move -- if Sally's income is high enough to qualify on her own -- is to have Sally apply individually and leave Frank off the loan.

(Video) Does Marriage Affect Your Credit Score? What Getting Married to Bad Credit/Good Credit Means To You

You can see where this might be a problem. Many couples have to carefully weigh whether it makes sense to apply jointly, and thus use both of their incomes on an application, or have only one person apply for the mortgage because of one spouse's bad credit.

Assuming Sally and Frank each earn $75,000 per year, it all boils down to whether a $75,000 income and an 801 FICO® Score is better than $150,000 in combined income and a 689 credit score. Some banks or mortgage programs may prefer the higher income and lower score, whereas other banks and mortgage programs may favor the lower income applicant with a higher credit score.

How to help a spouse improve or build credit

Helping a spouse improve their credit score is a sensitive topic that can blur the lines between relationship advice and financial advice. I can't help you with how to talk to your spouse about this sensitive subject, but I can show you how to improve a credit score when you're ready.

Following these six steps one-by-one will put your spouse on a well-worn path to a higher credit score:

  1. Look for any mistakes -- Credit scoring companies collect billions of pieces of information each year on hundreds of millions of people. Occasionally, they make a mistake, often because someone shares a name or address with someone else. Grab your spouse and visit the government-sponsored website, AnnualCreditReport.com, to pull their credit reports and look for any errors. If you find an account or record that doesn't look right, you can dispute its accuracy by filling out an online form. If the record can't be proven correct, it will be deleted, resulting in a nearly instant credit score improvement.
  2. Pay down balances -- Even people who pay on time all the time can have bad credit scores if they use too much of their available credit. For best results, never have a balance above 30% of your credit limit. On a credit card with a $5,000 limit, that means never having more than $1,500 of balances due on the card.
  3. Create a "good" account -- Your spouse needs to have at least one "good" account on their credit report to keep open for the long haul. If they already have an open no-annual-fee credit card, then use that. If not, have them sign up for one. If their credit is really bad, they may have to open a secured credit card account.
  4. Automate credit building -- Once your spouse has a credit account open, you just need to make sure it stays open and in good standing. The best way to do this is to set up the "good" credit card to automatically pay for one monthly bill and do nothing else. For example, you might use the credit card to pay for a recurring Netflix subscription, and then log in each month to pay off the small balance on the credit card. Doing this will keep the account open, and it will help ensure that the card never has a balance high enough to harm their credit score.
  5. Don't close old accounts -- Whatever you do, don't close an old account. Closing an old account won't make the bad history go away, but it will hurt your spouse's length of credit history. Put the credit cards in a difficult to access place if you must, but don't close them. Use them a couple times a year to make sure they stay open.
  6. Wait -- Building and rebuilding credit is not an overnight process. Late payments and other derogatory marks become less important with time, and they completely fall off a credit report in seven years, but the biggest gains happen relatively quickly as you'll see a bigger improvement from a bad mark aging from one month old to one year old than a bad mark aging from five years old to six years old.

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(Video) How Your Credit Will Be Affected If You Cosign|What Happens When Cosigning

FAQs

How does my credit score affect my spouse? ›

Credit scores are calculated on a specific individual's credit history. If your spouse has a bad credit score, it will not affect your credit score. However, when you apply for loans together, like mortgages, lenders will look at both your scores. If one of you has a poor credit score, it counts against you both.

Is my husband's credit score the same? ›

FALSE. Unless you add your spouse as an authorized user on a credit card account or the two of you jointly apply for a loan or open a joint credit card account, your individual accounts will not merge. 5. My poor credit won't impact my spouse's credit reports and credit scores.

Can someone else's credit score affect mine? ›

Can the people I live with affect my credit score? Not unless you're 'financially associated'. This means you've applied for joint credit together, such as a bank account or mortgage. If you do have joint finances with someone, they'll be recorded on your credit report as your 'financial associate'.

Can I still get a mortgage with my partner who has bad credit? ›

Yes, it's still possible to get a joint mortgage, even if one of you has bad credit. However, it'll be more difficult than if you both had perfect credit scores.

Do lenders look at both spouses credit scores? ›

If you and your partner decide on a joint mortgage, both of your credit scores will come into play. This guide will review how credit scores work, how they affect mortgage applications, how to calculate credit score on a joint mortgage and what to do if your partner has bad credit.

Will my poor credit rating affect my husband? ›

Your spouse's credit history won't hurt, change or erase your credit score or credit history. So if you have a glowing credit history, you won't automatically be harmed by marrying someone with a poor credit rating. That said, marriage is about building a future together.

Why do my wife and I have different credit scores? ›

Your Spouse Has Less Debt Than You: The amount of debt you carry is the second biggest factor that goes into your credit score. If you tend to carry big balances on credit cards in your name while your spouse pays their credit card in full each month, you'll see a difference in credit scores.

Do married credit scores combine? ›

There's no such thing as a marriage credit score. So credit histories and scores don't combine when you get married. And how your spouse uses their individual credit accounts can't impact your individual credit accounts.

What credit score does a couple need to buy a house? ›

Conventional Loan Requirements

It's recommended you have a credit score of 620 or higher when you apply for a conventional loan. If your score is below 620, lenders either won't be able to approve your loan or may be required to offer you a higher interest rate, which can result in higher monthly payments.

How do joint accounts affect credit scores? ›

As soon as you open an account together, you'll be 'co-scored' and your credit ratings will become linked. This doesn't happen by just living with someone – even if you're married. You'll lose some privacy. All other account holders will be able to see what you're spending money on.

Does who you live with affect your credit score? ›

If you're worried about the effect that your debt might have on the people you live with, it's worth knowing that credit files are independent of each other unless there is, or has been in the past, a specific financial link such as a joint loan.

Does living with someone affect credit score? ›

Having a personal connection with someone either because you are married, living under the same roof or have the same surname does not link your credit reports or affect your credit rating. However, if two or more people have formed a financial association then this can influence your credit report.

Do both people on a mortgage need good credit? ›

Lenders don't just average out your two credit scores or go with the highest one when evaluating your creditworthiness as a pair—they pay the most attention to the lowest credit score. If your credit is great but your spouse's isn't so hot, a joint mortgage application could be denied.

Can I get a mortgage with a credit score of 550? ›

Can you get a mortgage with a 550 credit score? Yes, you can. It's possible to get a mortgage whatever your credit score, but the lower your score, the fewer options you'll have when it comes to lenders willing to offer you a mortgage.

Can I buy a house if my spouse has no credit? ›

Buying a house when one spouse has bad credit is possible. But it means that you will either need to accept higher interest rates, take time to improve the credit score, or apply for a loan without your spouse.

What is the lowest credit score to buy a house? ›

Generally speaking, you'll need a credit score of at least 620 in order to secure a loan to buy a house. That's the minimum credit score requirement most lenders have for a conventional loan. With that said, it's still possible to get a loan with a lower credit score, including a score in the 500s.

How much of a home loan can I get with a 720 credit score? ›

You can borrow $50,000 - $100,000+ with a 720 credit score. The exact amount of money you will get depends on other factors besides your credit score, such as your income, your employment status, the type of loan you get, and even the lender.

Do they combine credit scores when buying a house? ›

Lenders use both partners' credit scores, but a common myth is that they take the scores and average them, which isn't the case. Instead, they do this: Each applicant has three credit scores (one from each major credit bureau), and the lender looks at all of them.

What happens when you marry someone with a low credit score? ›

Marrying a person with a bad credit history won't affect your own credit record. You and your spouse will continue to have separate credit reports after you marry. However, any debts that you take on jointly will be reported on both your and your spouse's credit reports.

What happens if your partner has a low credit score? ›

Credit scores become an issue when you and your partner are applying for a joint account, such as when you are planning to buy a house. If your partner has a poor credit score, it can make it more difficult for you to jointly qualify, or you may potentially have to pay much higher interest rates.

How can I improve my spouses credit score? ›

  1. Ways you can help your spouse improve their credit score. ...
  2. Add your husband or wife as an authorized user to your card. ...
  3. Help your spouse apply for a small loan. ...
  4. Ask your spouse to apply for a secured credit card. ...
  5. Review your spouse's credit report together. ...
  6. Have a frank discussion about managing money. ...
  7. Bottom line.
25 Jan 2022

What is a good combined credit score? ›

Although ranges vary depending on the credit scoring model, generally credit scores from 580 to 669 are considered fair; 670 to 739 are considered good; 740 to 799 are considered very good; and 800 and up are considered excellent.

Should married couples have separate credit cards? ›

It's often best for both spouses to have credit card accounts, in order to build and maintain strong credits scores by making timely payments. Better still, opening a new account means offers of rewards and other perks to enjoy.

How do you calculate combined credit score? ›

To take the average, you take add all the scores and then divide by the number of scores. In the example above, the average score for borrower 1 would be 712 ((750+701+685)/3). For borrower 2, the average score is 640 ((678+643+601)/3). The average of both scores is 676 ((712+640)/2).

Does adding my wife to my credit card help their credit? ›

Sharing a credit card can help the partner with the lower credit score start to build their credit and raise their score. There are two options for sharing a card, Kuderna explains. You can open a joint card or have the spouse with the lower credit score become an authorized user on the other's credit card.

How does credit work as a married couple? ›

Do married couples share credit scores? No. Each married partner retains their own credit score—which means that if one partner entered the marriage with good credit and the other entered the marriage with poor credit, neither partner's credit score will change simply because they have become legally married.

Can I check my husband's credit report? ›

Can I check his credit reports, and if so how? A: No, you can't check your spouse's (or ex's) personal credit reports. In order to request a consumer report on someone else, you must have what's called a “permissible purpose” under federal law, and marriage or divorce is not one of them.

What is a good credit score to buy a house in 2022? ›

You need at least a 620 credit score to buy a house with a conventional loan in 2022. But, you'll find that there are several other loan types that have much lower requirements. Many first-time home buyers worry that their credit scores are too low to buy a home.

What credit score do you need to buy a 500k house? ›

What credit score is needed to buy a house? For most loan types, the credit score needed to buy a house is at least 620. However, a higher score significantly improves your chances of approval.

How much of a loan can I get with a 650 credit score? ›

You can borrow as much as $40,000 - $100,000+ with a 650 credit score. The exact amount of money you will get depends on other factors besides your credit score, such as your income, your employment status, the type of loan you get, and even the lender.

What are the disadvantages of joint account? ›

Cons of Joint Bank Accounts
  • Access. A single account holder could drain the account at any time without permission from the other account holder(s)—a risk of joint bank accounts during a breakup.
  • Dependence. ...
  • Inequity. ...
  • Lack of privacy. ...
  • Shared liability. ...
  • Reduced benefits.
31 Mar 2022

Is it better to have a joint account or separate accounts? ›

Joint accounts can make it easier to budget and share financial information as a couple. Separate accounts might be a better fit for you if you want to keep most of your financial information private.

Is it good to have a joint account with your spouse? ›

Joint accounts can be a good way to combine and grow your money to work toward your common goals. They can also help couples keep each other in check on spending habits. Saving on fees. Joint accounts might also save on penalties and fines.

How do I separate my credit from my husband? ›

Here are 10 ways to safeguard your credit and finances in a divorce.
  1. Close joint accounts immediately. ...
  2. Notify creditors about your divorce. ...
  3. Get monthly statements. ...
  4. Don't fight tooth and nail for the house. ...
  5. Keep your address up to date. ...
  6. Avoid spending binges and revenge shopping.

How can I raise my credit score in 30 days? ›

Someone with a low score is better positioned to quickly make gains than someone with a strong credit history. Paying bills on time and using less of your available credit limit on cards can raise your credit in as little as 30 days.

Why is my credit score low when I have no debt? ›

Your credit score may be low — even if you don't have debt — if you: Frequently open or close accounts and lines of credit. Generate lots of hard inquiries on your credit (which is easy to do, if you're not careful when you shop around for a loan and want to see what lender will give you the best interest rate)

What affects credit score the most? ›

The most important factor of your FICO® Score , used by 90% of top lenders, is your payment history, or how you've managed your credit accounts. Close behind is the amounts owed—and more specifically how much of your available credit you're using—on your credit accounts. The three other factors carry less weight.

How long are you financially linked to someone? ›

Information on your credit report can remain there for up to six years. Any financial associations you've had in the past six years will remain on your credit report, even after a joint product has been closed down.

How can I quickly raise my credit score? ›

10 tips to improve your credit score
  1. Prove where you live. ...
  2. Build your credit history. ...
  3. Make regular payments on time. ...
  4. Keep your credit utilisation low. ...
  5. See if you could get an instant score boost. ...
  6. Check for errors and report any mistakes on your report. ...
  7. Monitor your credit file for fraudulent activity.

Does my wife's credit affect mine? ›

Credit scores are calculated on a specific individual's credit history. If your spouse has a bad credit score, it will not affect your credit score. However, when you apply for loans together, like mortgages, lenders will look at both your scores. If one of you has a poor credit score, it counts against you both.

How much can I borrow with a 700 credit score? ›

You can borrow $50,000 - $100,000+ with a 700 credit score. The exact amount of money you will get depends on other factors besides your credit score, such as your income, your employment status, the type of loan you get, and even the lender.

Can I get a mortgage with one good and bad credit? ›

Yes, it's still possible to get a joint mortgage, even if one of you has bad credit. However, it'll be more difficult than if you both had perfect credit scores.

What's a bad credit score? ›

A credit score of 600 or below is generally considered to be a bad credit score. And if your credit is low, you may qualify for a loan but the terms and rates may not be favorable. Credit scores between 601 and 669 are considered fair credit scores.

What is a decent credit score to buy a car? ›

What Is the Minimum Score Needed to Buy a Car? In general, lenders look for borrowers in the prime range or better, so you will need a score of 661 or higher to qualify for most conventional car loans.

How accurate is Experian? ›

Is Experian Accurate? Credit scores from the credit bureaus are only as accurate as the information provided to the bureau. Check your credit report to ensure all the information is correct. If it is, your Experian credit scores are accurate.

Is my wife entitled to half my house if it's in my name? ›

It depends on who is named on the mortgage. This is called joint and several liability. You are both responsible and liable for paying the mortgage. That doesn't mean you are both liable for half each though – if one person doesn't pay their share, the other can still be held responsible for the whole mortgage.

What credit score is good to buy a house? ›

It's recommended you have a credit score of 620 or higher when you apply for a conventional loan. If your score is below 620, lenders either won't be able to approve your loan or may be required to offer you a higher interest rate, which can result in higher monthly payments.

How many lines of credit should I have to buy a house? ›

Having a good credit score is incredibly important — but so is the way you built it. A rough rule of thumb: You will need 3 open tradelines to qualify for a conventional loan.

Does my partner's debt affect my credit score? ›

Your spouse's bad debt shouldn't have an effect on your own credit score, unless the debt is in both your names. If you've taken out a credit agreement together, for example, on a mortgage or joint credit card, then your partner will be listed on your credit report as a financial associate.

What happens if you marry someone with a low credit score? ›

Marrying a person with a bad credit history won't affect your own credit record. You and your spouse will continue to have separate credit reports after you marry. However, any debts that you take on jointly will be reported on both your and your spouse's credit reports.

What happens to credit score when married? ›

What happens to your credit when you get married? In most cases, nothing happens to your credit score when you get married. Getting married does not affect your credit score, and you and your spouse will continue to maintain separate credit histories and credit reports.

What happens when you marry someone with debt? ›

In common law states, debt taken on after marriage is usually treated as being separate and belonging only to the spouse who incurred them. The exception are those debts that are in the spouse's name only but benefit both partners.

Does my husband's debt affect me? ›

No. Even in community property states, debts incurred before the marriage remain the sole responsibility of the individual. So if your spouse is still paying off student loans, for instance, you shouldn't worry that you'll become liable for their debt after you get married.

How can I improve my spouses credit score? ›

  1. Ways you can help your spouse improve their credit score. ...
  2. Add your husband or wife as an authorized user to your card. ...
  3. Help your spouse apply for a small loan. ...
  4. Ask your spouse to apply for a secured credit card. ...
  5. Review your spouse's credit report together. ...
  6. Have a frank discussion about managing money. ...
  7. Bottom line.
25 Jan 2022

Is a wife responsible for husbands debt? ›

You are not responsible for someone else's debt. When someone dies with an unpaid debt, if the debt needs to be paid, it should be paid from any money or property they left behind according to state law. This is often called their estate.

Why is my husband's credit score higher than mine? ›

Your Spouse Has Less Debt Than You: The amount of debt you carry is the second biggest factor that goes into your credit score. If you tend to carry big balances on credit cards in your name while your spouse pays their credit card in full each month, you'll see a difference in credit scores.

Should I marry someone who has a lot of debt? ›

A person can still be a great spouse even with a bad credit report. But it does mean that your marriage might come with certain challenges, such as not having as much income to spend or having a harder time meeting your other financial goals.

Should married couples have separate credit cards? ›

It's often best for both spouses to have credit card accounts, in order to build and maintain strong credits scores by making timely payments. Better still, opening a new account means offers of rewards and other perks to enjoy.

Does adding my wife to my credit card help their credit? ›

Sharing a credit card can help the partner with the lower credit score start to build their credit and raise their score. There are two options for sharing a card, Kuderna explains. You can open a joint card or have the spouse with the lower credit score become an authorized user on the other's credit card.

Do joint accounts affect credit score? ›

As soon as you open an account together, you'll be 'co-scored' and your credit ratings will become linked. This doesn't happen by just living with someone – even if you're married. You'll lose some privacy. All other account holders will be able to see what you're spending money on.

How do I separate my credit from my husband? ›

Here are 10 ways to safeguard your credit and finances in a divorce.
  1. Close joint accounts immediately. ...
  2. Notify creditors about your divorce. ...
  3. Get monthly statements. ...
  4. Don't fight tooth and nail for the house. ...
  5. Keep your address up to date. ...
  6. Avoid spending binges and revenge shopping.

How do you protect yourself when married with debt? ›

To protect yourself from the liability you may face from your spouse's spending habits, you may want to consider a prenuptial agreement. A prenuptial agreement is a contract you make with your fiancé to specify how assets and debts will be handled during the marriage and divided in the event of a divorce.

How serious is financial infidelity? ›

The effects can be devastating: a 2018 study showed 76% of married couples involved in financial infidelity say the experience negatively impacted their relationship, and 10% got divorced over it.

How can I not be responsible for my spouse's debt? ›

In non-community property states, you're not responsible for your spouse's debts unless you're a co-signer on the debt. For credit card debt, you're not liable for the debt on your spouse's card if you're just an authorized user (as opposed to a co-signer).

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