Pumpkin Seed Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits (2023)

Pumpkin seeds are a satisfying, calorie-dense snack with several vitamins and minerals to offer. If you're trying to lose weight, you might be concerned about the calories in pumpkin seeds. With proper portion control, however, pumpkin seeds can curb cravings for empty-calorie snacks and give your body the nutrition it needs for optimal functioning.

Pumpkin Seed Nutrition Facts

The USDA provides the following nutrition information for 1 ounce (28g or 85 seeds) of whole roasted pumpkin seeds prepared without salt.

  • Calories: 126
  • Fat: 5.5g
  • Sodium: 5mg
  • Carbohydrates: 15.2g
  • Fiber: 5.2g
  • Sugars: 0g
  • Protein: 5.3g

Carbs

A single serving of pumpkin seedsprovides 15.2grams of carbohydrate, but only about 10 grams ofnet carbs since the serving also provides 5.2 grams of fiber.

Fats

Asingle serving of pumpkin seeds provides a little more than 5grams of total fat. Most of the fat content in packaged products comes from fats added during the roasting process.

If you roast the seeds inone tablespoon of butter,add 102 calories, 12 grams of fat, 7 grams of saturated fat, and 2 milligrams of sodium.

If you roast the seeds inone tablespoon of olive oil,add 119 calories, 14 grams of fat, 1.9 grams of saturated fat (but 10 grams of monounsaturated fat and 1.4 grams of polyunsaturated fat).

Protein

Roasted pumpkin seeds provide 5.3 grams of protein per ounce.

Vitamins and Minerals

Pumpkin seeds contain essential minerals, including magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and zinc.

It's important to note that there are2,325 milligrams of sodium in 1 teaspoon of table salt. Choose unsalted pumpkin seeds or use salt sparingly to avoid turning pumpkin seeds into a high-sodium snack.

Health Benefits

Pumpkin seeds provide a boost of healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, and the nutrients in pumpkin seeds are helpful for managing a variety of health conditions.

Supports Cell Growth and Repair

Protein is an essential nutrient required for our body to build tissues. Adult men and women 31 to 50 years old need about 6 ounce-equivalents and 5 ounce-equivalents, respectively, each day. Having an ounce or two of pumpkin seeds for a snack can help you reach this recommendation, supplying your body with the adequate foundation of amino acid building blocks.

(Video) HEALTH BENEFITS OF PUMPKIN SEEDS

Promotes Good Sleep

Pumpkin seeds are a natural source of tryptophan, an amino acid that's associated with improvements in sleep. Incorporating pumpkin seeds in an overall healthy diet may help you get a restful night's sleep and wake up feeling refreshed.

Relieves Prostate Symptoms

Enlarged prostate, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP), is a common problem for older men. Resulting symptoms on the urinary tract can hinder quality of life, including the frequent urge to urinate. A recent study suggests the effectiveness of pumpkin seed extract in improving the lives of those living with BPH.

Enhances Immune Function

Consuming 1 ounce of roasted pumpkin seeds (or about 85 seeds) provides 20% of your daily value for zinc. Zinc is a crucial mineral that's not stored in the body, so regular intake is necessary. Zinc deficiencies lead to an impairment in key immune processes, including natural killer T cell function. Adequate zinc is also vital for proper wound healing after an injury or infection.

Reduces Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood that are associated with heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are known to help reduce high triglycerides, hence reducing unhealthy cardiovascular markers. A study conducted on patients on maintenance hemodialysis provided a milled seed mixture of pumpkin, flax, and sesame seeds demonstrated a 30% reduction in serum triglycerides after 12 weeks of supplementation. The combination of beneficial fats and fiber in seeds produces cumulative positive effects.

Allergies

It is possible to have an allergic reaction to pumpkin seeds, although reports of this allergy are very rare. Allergies can develop at any time. Pumpkin meat or seed allergy symptoms may include chest tightness,hives,and vomiting. If you suspect an allergy to pumpkin, seek care from a healthcare professional.

Adverse Effects

If you're not accustomed to eating a lot of fiber, it can take some time for your digestive system to adjust to eating pumpkin seeds. Increase your intake gradually to avoid uncomfortable symptoms like gas, bloat, or constipation.

Varieties

Not all pumpkin seeds provide the same benefits. If you buy processed or packaged pumpkin seeds, you're likely to get an extra dose of sodium and preservatives.

For example, popular brands of pumpkin seed packets found in the snack or candy aisle may add a whopping 815 milligrams of sodium per 1-ounce serving. Roasting your own pumpkin seeds or eating them raw provides maximal nutrition.

Storage and Food Safety

When harvesting fresh pumpkin seeds, it's important to remove the seeds immediately after cutting into the pumpkin. Pumpkins are a low acid vegetable that is prone to bacteria growth when left to sit out at room temperature.

Keep raw pumpkin seeds in the refrigerator or freezer to extend their shelf life. Fresh seeds are high in oils that can go rancid quickly. Seal roasted pumpkin seeds in an airtight container and keep at room temperature.

How to Prepare

A small handful of pumpkin seeds makes a great snack at any time. However, pumpkin seeds are easy to overeat. Be mindful of portion sizes by measuring a few tablespoons and putting them into a serving bowl.

Top your soups and salads with raw or roasted pumpkin seeds. You can also sprinkle them into a turkey wrap with hummus for a savory crunch.

Roasting pumpkin seeds is simple. Just follow these steps:

(Video) Nutritional Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds – Dr. Berg

  1. After you remove the seeds from a pumpkin, rinse them thoroughly in a colanderand remove any stringy, wet pulp that is attached to them.
  2. Dry the pumpkin seeds with a paper towel.
  3. Add a small amount of olive oil and seasonings. Use a dash of salt, soy sauce, Worcestershiresauce, garlic powder, pumpkin spice seasoning, or whatever you like.
  4. Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil and roast pumpkin seeds flat in the oven at 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Cook until golden brown, for about 45 minutes.
  5. Allow seeds to cool and enjoy.

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. FoodData central. Seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, whole, roasted, without salt. U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  2. Gordon B. How much protein should I eat?. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

  3. Pumpkin seeds pack a healthy punch. American Heart Association.

  4. Leibbrand M, Siefer S, Schön C, et al. Effects of an oil-free hydroethanolic pumpkin seed extract on symptom frequency and severity in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia: A pilot study in humans. J Med Food. 2019;22(6):551-559. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2018.0106

    (Video) Pumpkin Seeds Benefits, Good for the Prostate?

  5. Zinc fact sheet for health professionals. National Institutes of Health. Office of Dietary Supplements.

  6. Ristic-medic D, Perunicic-Pekovic G, Rasic-Milutinovic Z, et al. Effects of dietary milled seed mixture on fatty acid status and inflammatory markers in patients on hemodialysis. ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:563576. doi:10.1155/2014/563576

  7. Chatain C, Pin I, Pralong P, Jacquier JP, Leccia MT. Medicinal bioactivites and allergenic properties of pumpkin seeds: Review upon a pediatric food anaphylaxis case report. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;49(6):244-251. doi:10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.19

  8. Don't let allergies and asthma haunt your Halloween fun. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

  9. Hirsch DW. Pumpkins are a terrible thing to waste.... University of Connecticut College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources Extension.

Pumpkin Seed Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits (1)

By Malia Frey, M.A., ACE-CHC, CPT
Malia Frey is a weight loss expert, certified health coach, weight management specialist, personal trainer​, and fitness nutrition specialist.

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(Video) What Happens To Your Body If You Eat Pumpkin Seeds Daily

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FAQs

What happens to your body if you eat pumpkin seeds daily? ›

Studies show that the antioxidants in pumpkin seeds also increase nitric oxide levels in your body. This molecule works to keep your blood vessels smooth, flexible, and healthy, improving blood flow and reducing the risk of heart and circulation problems.

Can pumpkin seeds raise blood pressure? ›

No. Pumpkin seeds lower blood pressure. Pumpkin seeds are rich in magnesium that lowers blood pressure by increasing nitric oxide synthesis.

How many grams of pumpkin seeds should you eat a day? ›

Rich in magnesium, iron and fibre, the seeds make for a healthy and crunchy snack. The American Heart Association recommends having a quarter cup (30 grams) of pumpkin seeds every day as a part of a healthy diet.

What is the healthiest way to eat pumpkin seeds? ›

Eating the shells only adds to the seeds' high fiber content, which has been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and obesity. Whole, roasted pumpkin seeds in their shells contain about 5.2 grams of fiber per serving, while shelled seeds contain just 1.8 grams.

Are pumpkin seeds high in iron? ›

Pumpkin Seeds May Be Small, But They Have Lots of Iron

A 1-ounce serving of raw pumpkin seeds without shells has 2.7 mg of iron, per the USDA, providing a good iron source in a variety of dishes.

Do pumpkin seeds help you sleep? ›

They provide a natural source of tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes sleep. Research shows that 1 gram of tryptophan daily improves sleep. Pumpkin seeds also contain both magnesium and zinc. Zinc has been shown to increase levels of serotonin in the body which helps control your sleep cycle.

Do pumpkin seeds have omega-3? ›

Pumpkin seeds are rich in alpha-linolenic acid, which is the plant based form of omega-3 fatty acid, this means they're perfect for vegans and vegetarians who can't get omega-3s from animal sourced foods.

Who should avoid pumpkin seeds? ›

4. Not safe for those with low blood pressure. If you already have low blood pressure (hypotension), then just bid adieu to pumpkin seeds as they are antioxidant in nature, and help to lower blood pressure. Consult an expert before opting for these seeds, in case you wish to eat them.

Are pumpkin seeds good for kidneys? ›

Pumpkin Seeds Prevents Kidney Stones

Additionally, it has been known to have a positive impact on circulation as well as kidney and liver function. Through these activities, the pumpkin seed prevents the accumulation of uric acid in the body in the form of kidney stones.

How long does it take for pumpkin seeds to lower blood pressure? ›

Phytoestrogens are compounds found in plants and are comparable to human estrogen, capable of producing estrogenic effects. Studies in post menopausal women have demonstrated that pumpkin seed oil, at a dose of 2g per day for 12 weeks can decrease blood pressure and reduce menopausal symptoms.

Can we eat pumpkin seeds in empty stomach? ›

“Consuming 15 grams of these seeds early in the morning every day is a must. If you'll take them on an empty stomach with lukewarm water, it will help in cleansing the body” she concluded.

Does pumpkin seeds promote hair growth? ›

Pumpkin seed oil is rich in heart-healthy fats and antioxidants. Animal and human studies have shown it can improve heart health, increase hair growth, and support urinary tract health. It's also very versatile and can be used as cooking oil, taken as a supplement, or combined with other oils and applied to the scalp.

Can I eat pumpkin seeds raw? ›

Pumpkin seeds can be seasoned and enjoyed raw or roasted for a simple snack option. They can also add crunch to soups, salads, sandwiches, and homemade trail mix. Pumpkin and pumpkin seeds make great ingredients in soups and salads, as well as numerous other dishes, whether raw or cooked.

Why are pumpkin seeds good for females? ›

Pumpkin Seeds Improve Bone Density

Pumpkin seeds benefits for women in terms of a better bone density are extensive. Being highly rich in magnesium and calcium, pumpkin seeds help maintain healthy bones. It also helps reduce the risk of osteoporosis in women ( a common issue among women post-menopause).

Is pumpkin seeds good for cholesterol? ›

Heart healthy

There has been good evidence that eating pumpkin seeds as part of a balanced diet, because of their ALA content, may well be beneficial for the heart and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. A 2011 study also found that pumpkin seed oil helped improve cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women.

Which is better raw or roasted pumpkin seeds? ›

While both raw and roasted pumpkin seeds offer health benefits, raw pumpkin seeds offer more nutritional value because some nutrients are destroyed during the roasting process.

What are the disadvantages of eating pumpkin seeds? ›

If you eat too many, you may experience gas and bloating. Fiber helps bulk up stool and prevents constipation in the long run, but eating a lot of pumpkin seeds at once may actually cause constipation. As you snack on pumpkin seeds, keep in mind they're high in calories and fat.

Why are pumpkin seeds good for females? ›

Pumpkin Seeds Improve Bone Density

Pumpkin seeds benefits for women in terms of a better bone density are extensive. Being highly rich in magnesium and calcium, pumpkin seeds help maintain healthy bones. It also helps reduce the risk of osteoporosis in women ( a common issue among women post-menopause).

Can I eat pumpkin seeds raw? ›

Pumpkin seeds can be seasoned and enjoyed raw or roasted for a simple snack option. They can also add crunch to soups, salads, sandwiches, and homemade trail mix. Pumpkin and pumpkin seeds make great ingredients in soups and salads, as well as numerous other dishes, whether raw or cooked.

Do pumpkin seeds help you sleep? ›

They provide a natural source of tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes sleep. Research shows that 1 gram of tryptophan daily improves sleep. Pumpkin seeds also contain both magnesium and zinc. Zinc has been shown to increase levels of serotonin in the body which helps control your sleep cycle.

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