Some Babies Sleep Better in Car Seats and Swings, but Are They Safe? (Published 2020) (2022)

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Recent product recalls, and a new study, reaffirm the old advice: Infants should sleep flat on their backs in a crib.

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Some Babies Sleep Better in Car Seats and Swings, but Are They Safe? (Published 2020) (1)

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By Craig Canapari, M.D.

This story was originally published on May 24, 2019 in NYT Parenting.

A new study published May 20 in the journal Pediatrics highlights the risks of allowing babies to sleep for extended periods in rocking devices or car seats. If the thought of giving up your infant swing or vibrating chair is daunting, I get it. My first child is now 11. Although day-to-day memories of his first few months are fading, one that remains fresh is his screaming. As an infant, he was often difficult to soothe. My wife or I would put him in his car seat: Cue the screams. Rocking chair? Screams. Crib? Tummy time? Stroller? Guess. The one thing that worked was his infant swing. We would strap him in, turn on the motor that swung the cushioned seat back and forth, and count on about 30 minutes of blissful silence while he snoozed.

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Safe sleep advocates, and pediatricians like me, have long been concerned about the array of rocking or bouncing devices on the market that promise to calm crying infants. But if you had told me, as the new father of a fussy 3-month-old, that I needed to give up the swing, I’m not sure what I would have done.

Yet, the real dangers associated with these devices cannot be ignored. Early last month, Fisher-Price recalled its popular Rock ’n Play sleeper after multiple infant deaths in the device were reported. Just two weeks later, Kids II recalled its similar rocking sleepers after five infants died.

It is a heartbreaking situation. One of the earliest reports to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, from January 2018, reads as follows:

My 6-month-old son was put down for a nap in the Fisher Price Rock n Play. During the time of his nap, he rolled over in the Rock N Play and silently died. The Rock N Play is sold as a sleeper and is marketed for “great overnight sleep” . . . My son was a beautiful, healthy baby and only died because of the Rock N Play and the false sense of security they provide with their false and UNSAFE claims of the Rock N Play being used for safe sleep. The only place for safe sleep for an infant is a flat surface. This death trap needs to be recalled and labeled as a SUPERVISED PLAY PRODUCT so no other family has to lose their child like I have.

The authors of the Pediatrics study, led by Dr. Jeffrey Colvin, reviewed a registry of more than 10,000 infant deaths that occurred during sleep. Approximately 3 percent of these deaths took place in what the authors called “sitting devices”: car seats, swings, bouncers and strollers. The majority of the infants who died in “sitting devices” were between 1 and 4 months old, and the majority of the deaths were due to suffocation. Of the deaths that occurred in “sitting devices,” over 60 percent occurred in car seats, 35 percent in swings and under 5 percent in strollers. While incorrect harness use was the biggest risk factor, other risk factors resembled those for SIDS: infants born prematurely or at a low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds) and secondhand smoke exposure. Deaths in “sitting devices” were also found to be more likely when a caregiver was sleeping or distracted, and when someone other than a parent was watching the baby.

Yet, for some parents, the baby in motion is the only baby who sleeps: either back and forth in a swing or a parent’s arms, or back and forth in a car or stroller on an aimless cruise around town (God forbid you hit any traffic). That is why devices which promise (and sometimes deliver) a calm and sleepy baby with less parental exertion are so alluring. It’s not a coincidence that most of the deaths occurred in the first few months of life, when babies are still waking up frequently and many parents are going back to work. What is an exhausted parent to do?

What does safe sleep look like?

The safest sleep environment for an infant is the most boring setting you can imagine: a flat, empty crib, devoid of blankets, bumpers, cushions or even stuffed animals. In a perfect world, you put your baby down on his back drowsy but awake, and he sleeps, still and sound, for long stretches at night, as well as extended daytime naps.

(Video) Safe Infant Sleep for Grandparents and Other Trusted Caregivers – Full Length

When is it safe to have your child sleep elsewhere?

Sometimes sleep on the move is inevitable, and most babies will need to fall sleep in a car seat or stroller from time to time; the authors of the Pediatrics study took pains to reiterate the fact that car seats remain the safest way for babies to travel, and to note that almost all of the car seat-related deaths occurred outside a motor vehicle. It’s also important to remember that deaths in these devices were relatively rare. Yet there are a few rules of thumb to keep in mind.

First, babies in car seats, strollers and bouncers should be observed. Obviously, this is impractical if you are, say, driving a car, but you should never leave your child alone in a car seat. For devices like swings and rockers, you must be nearby and keeping an eye on your baby.

Second, rockers, bouncers and other such devices must be used as their manufacturers recommend. Use any seatbelts or restraints that are included (some of the Rock ’n Play-linked deaths occurred when unrestrained infants rolled sideways and suffocated). Make sure your child is not too big or too small for the device. Avoid any device that has an active recall, especially if your baby may fall asleep in it. Make sure you send in the warranty card when you purchase a device so you can receive safety notifications. If you are using a secondhand device, you can check to see if there is an active recall in the United States on the Consumer Product Safety Commission website. And remember that you should avoid using a secondhand car seat. The materials used in car seats may weaken over time, and if they have been in an accident, they may not function correctly.

Here’s the most important part: Once your child falls asleep in a swing or a car seat (outside of the car), you should transfer him to a crib or bassinet. As Dr. Colvin noted, “Just like you would never let your infant travel in a car unless they were in a car seat, you should never let your infant sleep when outside of the car unless they are in a crib or bassinet.”

Other Concerns

In my pediatric sleep clinic, overuse of swings and car seats to help babies fall asleep tends to result in frequent nighttime awakenings. Why is this? Everyone has natural awakenings during the night. If your baby gets used to falling asleep in a swing and you transfer her to her crib once she is sound asleep, she is likely to need that swing to fall back asleep whenever she has one of her natural nighttime awakenings. This condition is called inappropriate sleep onset association. In practical terms, this means that, to get your baby to return to sleep, you will need to provide the same circumstances she needed to fall asleep at bedtime. (The treatment for this is sleep training.)

Another concern is that overuse of these devices can lead to flattening of the skull in some infants. Although this is generally benign, a helmet or other device may be necessary to resolve the issue — and most parents would prefer to avoid it in the first place. The American Academy of Pediatrics has some information on this here.

What should you do if you are really struggling?

Poor infant sleep is often very stressful for parents and is associated with postpartum depression. Compounding parental exhaustion is the fact that parents in the United States have significantly less parental leave than parents in other industrialized nations, often returning to work before their babies are sleeping through the night. I suspect this is why adherence to the “Back to Sleep” recommendation for safe sleep plateaued in 2001. Although sudden infant death syndrome rates continue to decline, a concurrent increase in the rate of suffocation and strangulation deaths has led to a plateau in the rate of infant sleep-associated deaths since the late 1990s. These may be associated with the kind of unsafe sleep practices that are used by exhausted parents, often accidentally (such as falling asleep with the baby on a couch). Although it is difficult to study, there is some evidence that increasing parental leave is associated with fewer infant deaths.

I spoke with Dr. Harvey Karp (author of “The Happiest Baby on the Block,” which I relied on when my first son was crying all the time) about the challenges facing new parents. He noted that the safe sleep guidelines can only go so far when no provision is made for the sleep of exhausted parents.

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Dr. Karp developed the SNOO, a bassinet that uses motion, sound and swaddling to calm crying babies. Unlike the Rock ’n Play or similar devices, the SNOO meets the same safety requirements as a bassinet or crib and, in a recent study, was shown to be almost as effective as parental attention in soothing crying infants. The cost of the SNOO puts it out of reach of most young families, but it is heartening to see more innovation in this space. We need to find novel and safe ways to help exhausted parents to both sleep and keep their babies asleep. More generous family leave policies are necessary too, Dr. Colvin noted. “As a community, we need to develop programs that support families with infants and fill in the gaps, especially when it comes to directly assisting those families and providing respite for parents,” Dr. Colvin said.

If you are struggling, I strongly recommend discussing your concerns with your child’s pediatrician, both to rule out any medical cause for your baby’s irritability (such as acid reflux or a milk protein allergy), and to come up with strategies to help you manage your exhaustion. These may include asking a grandparent or friend to provide some respite care or, if your child is over 4 months old, sleep training.

The bottom line

The prospect of transferring an infant — peacefully asleep, at long last — from car seat to crib can feel agonizing in the moment. But it is crucial to avoid unsafe sleep practices, because they can have catastrophic consequences. Try to remember that, in time, your child will sleep better, and so will you. Ask for help, be safe and hang in there.

Craig Canapari, M.D., is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Yale University, director of the Pediatric Sleep Center at Yale-New Haven Hospital and the author of It’s Never Too Late to Sleep Train. He blogs about childhood sleep issues on his website.

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FAQs

Why does my baby sleep so well in the car seat? ›

"In a car seat there's the rocking motion, you're pretty sedentary, and you're in the back seat and not being engaged. It's very easy to fall asleep." And, Stevens continues, infants need a lot more sleep than adults and it's pretty likely that a nap time will coincide with a car trip.

Is it OK to let my baby sleep in the car seat? ›

Parents and caregivers should feel confident that using an infant car seat is essential in a car, but a baby shouldn't be left unattended in a car seat, and it shouldn't be your baby's primary sleeping place, Thomas says. Neither a car seat nor an inclined sleeper is an appropriate substitute for a crib or bassinet.

Is it safe for baby to sleep in swing all night? ›

A catnap under your supervision might be fine, but your baby definitely shouldn't spend the night sleeping in the swing while you're asleep, too. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends moving your baby from the swing to a safe sleeping place if they fall asleep in the swing.

Is it safe for baby to sleep in Fisher Price swing? ›

The American Academy Pediatrics (AAP) advises against letting your baby fall asleep in any infant seating device like bouncy chairs, swings, and other carriers. There is a risk in allowing your baby to sleep anywhere but on a flat, firm surface, on their backs, for their first year of life.

Is swing good for baby brain? ›

Babies and children crave activities that are developmentally good for them and swinging is right up there for providing excellent stimulation to bodies and brains.

How long can a newborn stay in a swing? ›

In general, baby swings can be used at birth and until your baby reaches a certain weight limit, usually about 25 to 35 pounds.

When can a baby be in a car seat longer than 2 hours? ›

Many car seat manufacturers recommend that a baby should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours, within a 24 hour time period. This is because when a baby is in a semi-upright position for a prolonged period of time it can result in: 1. A strain on the baby's still-developing spine.

How do you prevent positional asphyxiation in car seats? ›

Whenever possible, an adult should ride in the back seat with baby to check baby's head and neck position and breathing. Use only straps to position baby correctly and do not add pillows or blankets. Straps should always be completely buckled. Make sure baby's chin is up at all times.

What is positional asphyxia baby? ›

Positional asphyxia can happen to anyone, but it's most common in infants when a baby cannot get enough oxygen to breathe due to the positioning of their body. Some believe this type of asphyxiation is a result of an infant being trapped between a surface, with their nose and/or mouth covered and restricting air.

Can baby sleep in swing during the day? ›

Swings are known to lull babies to sleep, but the fact is, they aren't safe for overnight sleep or even napping.

Can baby sleep in mamaRoo swing overnight? ›

It can be used throughout the day or when parents need a hands-free moment. The mamaRoo infant seat is not intended for extended or overnight sleep since it is neither a flat surface (there is always a slight recline) or a firm surface as recommended by pediatricians.

Can I sleep if baby is awake in her crib? ›

While it's not the best idea, there are times when you could get so tired that you're no longer able to function properly, and a 10-minute power nap with your child awake in their crib would benefit you more than it would risk your child." She says that this is also something that just happens in the course of the day ...

Why can't babies sleep in a swing? ›

Unlike cribs or bassinets, swings aren't intended for sleep. Young babies don't have the muscle strength to hold their heads up, and sleeping in a semi-upright position (like in a car seat, swing, or bouncer) with their heads slumped over can cause suffocation.

Which baby swings are being recalled? ›

The recall affects about 2 million MamaRoo swings and 220,000 RockaRoo rockers in the U.S., as well as 60,000 MamaRoo swings and 10,000 RockaRoo rockers in Canada. When the swing or rocker aren't being used, restraint straps can hang below the seat, and crawling infants can become tangled in them, the recall said.

Is the MamaRoo swing safe to sleep in? ›

Is the mamaRoo® infant seat approved for overnight sleeping? No. Since it is neither a flat surface (there is always a slight recline) or a firm surface, as recommended by pediatricians, we cannot recommend that it be used for overnight sleep.

Can a swing give a baby shaken baby syndrome? ›

No. Young infants should have their head supported at all times and caregivers should avoid jostling them or throwing them in the air, but gentle bouncing, swinging or rocking won't cause shaken baby syndrome.

Can rocking cause shaken baby syndrome? ›

The parent admitted to forceful bouncing of the child in a baby rocker. Experiments showed that violent rocking in the chair could produce extreme alternating acceleration/deceleration forces in excess of those induced by shaking alone.

How do you break a baby from sleeping in a swing? ›

Here are some tips to breaking your baby's habit of sleeping in a swing: If you notice your baby getting drowsy in the swing, slowly and softly lift them out and move them to a firm, flat surface like a crib or bassinet. If they've already fallen asleep in their baby swing, take them out as soon as you notice.

What is the single most significant risk factor for SIDS? ›

Risk factors
  • Sex. Boys are slightly more likely to die of SIDS .
  • Age. Infants are most vulnerable between the second and fourth months of life.
  • Race. For reasons that aren't well-understood, nonwhite infants are more likely to develop SIDS .
  • Family history. ...
  • Secondhand smoke. ...
  • Being premature.
20 May 2022

Are baby swings safe for newborns? ›

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states babies are put in danger any time they're placed in a bouncy seat, baby swing, or carrier to sleep during their first year of life.

Why do babies throw their arms up while sleeping? ›

Then all of a sudden, her arms jerk, she wakes herself up, and you're back at square one trying to get her down to sleep again. This is what's called the Moro (startle) Reflex. It's a protective automatic reflex that all babies are born with, and it's completely normal!

Whats the longest baby can be in carseat? ›

However, infant healthcare professionals, safety experts and most car manufacturers recommend that babies should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours at a time and they should be taken out frequently. If your trip involves driving for long periods of time, you should stop for regular breaks.

Is it OK to drive long distance with a newborn? ›

How soon can a newborn travel long distances by car? If you are taking a long-distance trip, again, it's advised to wait until baby's immune system has fully developed at around two to three months old.

How often should you stop on a road trip with a baby? ›

Plan Frequent Breaks

Plan for stops every one to three hours during the day and three to six hours at night to change diapers, stretch legs, eat, and change sweaty or spit-up clothes as needed.

How long are babies at risk for positional asphyxiation? ›

A 2016 study found that babies 4 weeks and under are at greater risk of positional asphyxia. Positional asphyxia may be one reason why people die suddenly in a hog-tie restraint by police or military officers.

Can SIDS happen in a car seat? ›

Every year, several hundred infants fall victim to sleep-related deaths in sitting devices like car seats, bouncers or swings used improperly for routine sleep. A 10-year study of 11,779 infant sleep-related deaths showed that 348 (3%) babies died in sitting devices, in most cases while in car seats.

What is the body position that may cause asphyxia? ›

Pressure on the abdomen – even a thin person will have difficulty breathing if there is pressure on the abdomen. The more security officers there are holding a person down in a prone position, the greater the risk that there will pressure on the person's abdomen making it difficult to breathe.

How likely is positional asphyxiation? ›

That being said, a study by the Journal of Pediatrics, reviewing all non-accident related deaths reported to the Consumer Product Safety Commission between 2004 and 2008, found that 48 percent of car seat deaths and 75 percent of swing deaths were due to positional asphyxiation.

Why does my child's head falls forward in car seat? ›

Why does my baby's head tilt in car seat? If your baby's head tilts forward in the car seat you might want to make sure that there's nothing under their back and that the straps are tightly fastened. If this doesn't solve the problem then it may be because they don't like how tight or loose the straps are.

When should I stop using the cradle? ›

Cradles and cribs are designed keeping the age of the baby in mind. Follow this rule of thumb when shopping for your baby: Till 6-8 Months: It is generally safe for babies to use cradles till the age of 6-8 months.

Is mamaRoo safe for newborns? ›

The mamaRoo can be used from birth to 25 pounds or until a baby can sit up on his or her own.

When should you stop using a baby swing? ›

When should I stop using a baby swing? It is best to stop using the swing when your child reaches three months. Before that, they are still at risk from SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) if you place them on a flat surface for napping or put them down while they're still sleepy.

What is a container baby? ›

A "container baby" is a newborn baby or young infant who is placed in a container, such as a car seat or stroller, for an excessive amount of time in a given day. "Container baby syndrome" is the name used to describe a range of conditions caused by a baby or infant spending too much time in such containers.

Can baby sleep in dock a tot? ›

Can Baby Sleep in a DockATot? No, the DockATot is not safe for baby sleep. The warning label on the DockATot now says to not use it in a crib, bassinet, or other contained area. They also changed their guidelines in the fall of 2020 to no longer promote their Docks for bed sharing.

How long can babies sleep in MamaRoo? ›

Products like this can be used safely in moderation, but it's important never to leave your baby sleeping in Mamaroo. They should also not be left in these products for longer than 30 minutes at a time.

Can I leave my newborn while I shower? ›

It's usually fine to leave a young baby alone in her crib while you take a quick shower, for example, but this doesn't apply to swings and bouncy seats, which aren't as safe. (If you're really nervous, you can always tote baby in her car seat into the bathroom with you.)

How long do you let a baby cry it out for naps? ›

Generally speaking, a 30 to 60-minute crying window is a good range. Anything longer may become unbearable for the parent and too exhausting for the child. Anything shorter might not give them an adequate amount of time to fall asleep.

What do you do when baby wakes up wide awake at night? ›

If they're upset, create a connection point to help calm them, such as a soothing song or a long hug. If this is happening a few nights a week for only a week or two, it's OK to just wait it out. For some kids, nighttime is just too much separation.

Why can't babies sleep in carseats? ›

When your baby is seated, their heavy head can fall forward causing difficulty breathing…and even suffocation,” explains Dr. Harvey Karp. “That's why car seats—outside of moving cars—are not safe for naps or overnight sleep for the first year of life.”

Is swing good for baby brain? ›

Babies and children crave activities that are developmentally good for them and swinging is right up there for providing excellent stimulation to bodies and brains.

Are swings good for babies development? ›

Swinging develops a child's core muscles and helps with the development of balance. Spinning on a swing stimulates different parts of a child's brain simultaneously. This is important for learning skills such as spatial awareness, rhythm and balance and muscle control.

Why was MamaRoo discontinued? ›

4moms recalls MamaRoos, RockaRoos over entanglement hazards related to 1 death 4moms is recalling MamaRoos and RockaRoos due to entanglement hazards from straps that hang down from the rockers and swings when not in use. At least one baby has died as a result of asphyxiation.

What happened with MamaRoo swing? ›

More than 2 million MamaRoo swings, RockaRoo rockers recalled after baby dies of asphyxiation. More than 2 million infant swings and rockers are being recalled over entanglement and strangulation hazards after a 10-month-old baby died from asphyxiation.

What is the MamaRoo recall? ›

A recall has been issued for 4mom's 4mom's 3-point harness MamaRoo models (versions 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0) as well as its RockaRoo rockers. The recall follows two incidents where infants found themselves strangled by the restraint straps that hang below the chair when the seat is not in use.

Can a baby sleep in a swing all night? ›

Even a short nap in the swing is okay if you're in the same room and supervising your child. But letting your baby sleep all night in a swing can be dangerous. Babies — especially those under four months old — have weak neck muscles and can slump over, leading to suffocation.

How long can a newborn be in a swing? ›

In general, baby swings can be used at birth and until your baby reaches a certain weight limit, usually about 25 to 35 pounds.

Can my baby sleep in a mamaRoo all night? ›

It can be used for both overnight sleep and naps throughout the day. The mamaRoo infant seat is designed to comfort, soothe, and entertain your baby.

How long can a baby stay in a car seat? ›

There is no published evidence that states how long babies should stay in a car seat when travelling. However, infant healthcare professionals, safety experts and most car manufacturers recommend that babies should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours at a time and they should be taken out frequently.

What age can a baby be in a car seat longer than 2 hours? ›

When traveling with a baby the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that you take your baby out of the car seat every 2 hours, but when can you start doing longer drives? When a baby is older than 6 months and has full head control, talk to your pediatrician about longer stretches in the car seat.

What happens if baby is in car seat too long? ›

According to the study's authors, having your infant in the upright position that's created in a car seat for an extended period of time could increase the risk of suffocation—and they urge parents to avoid keeping their infants in car seats for more than 30 minutes at a time.

What is positional asphyxia baby? ›

What is Positional Asphyxia? Babies who experience positional asphyxia cannot breathe because the position of their body blocks their airway. This can occur in several ways: When the mouth and nose are blocked by something covering them.

Is it OK to drive long distance with a newborn? ›

How soon can a newborn travel long distances by car? If you are taking a long-distance trip, again, it's advised to wait until baby's immune system has fully developed at around two to three months old.

How long should I sit in the backseat with my newborn? ›

Many car seat manufacturers recommend that a baby should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours, within a 24 hour time period. This is because when a baby is in a semi-upright position for a prolonged period of time it can result in: 1. A strain on the baby's still-developing spine.

How often should you stop when driving with a baby? ›

It is important for you and your baby to get out of the car every few hours and take a stretch to avoid restlessness. Try to take a break every 2 to 3 hours for a day trip and every 4 to 6 hours at night to change diapers or soiled clothes, or to feed your baby.

Should car seat go behind driver or passenger? ›

Install in the Backseat

If not, it is fine behind either the driver or passenger side. The important thing is that it is in the back, away from the airbags.

What can cause SIDS? ›

Risk factors for SIDS include:
  • placing a baby on his side or stomach to sleep, rather than on his back.
  • premature or low birth weight babies.
  • overheating the baby during sleep.
  • sleeping on too soft a surface, with loose blankets and bumper pads.
  • having a sibling who died of SIDS, or a family history of failure to thrive.

How can you prevent container baby syndrome? ›

How Do I Prevent Container Baby Syndrome?
  1. Outside of transport, limit container use to 15-20 min, 2 times throughout your baby's day.
  2. Limit the use of containers to when you need to keep your baby safe while you are trying to do something productive around the house!
16 May 2020

Can car seats cause oxygen deprivation? ›

Aug. 24, 2009 -- Leaving young infants in car seats for extended periods of time may result in low oxygen levels and put them at risk for breathing problems, according to a new study. Researchers say car seats are essential for the safe transportation of infants.

When can babies face forward in 2021? ›

The AAP now recommends that kids sit rear-facing until at least age 2. NHTSA now recommends: “Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat's manufacturer.”

How long are babies at risk for positional asphyxiation? ›

A 2016 study found that babies 4 weeks and under are at greater risk of positional asphyxia. Positional asphyxia may be one reason why people die suddenly in a hog-tie restraint by police or military officers.

What is silent asphyxiation? ›

Positional asphyxia snatches innocent lives without warning signs everyday, and it happens to even the most careful of parents. There is no gasping for breath or screaming and wailing — it is the silent killer.

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