Tomato Leaf Problems: A Visual Guide - You Should Grow (2022)

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If you’ve ever grown tomatoes before, you’re probably familiar with tomato leaf problems. You might have noticed your tomato plant leaves turning yellow, brown, or getting spots.

So what causes these tomato plant problems?

We all love the flavor of a homegrown tomato. You just can’t get the same intensity and sweetness from any tomato at the grocery store. But homegrown tomatoes also come with lots of pest and disease issues.

The unfortunate reality is that tomatoes are susceptible to many pests and diseases. And many of them lead to yellow or brown spots on tomato leaves. Often you can determine the cause of the issue just by looking at the leaves.

The particular pattern of yellowing or spotting will give you lots of information about what disease or pest is plaguing your tomato plant. Use this guide to tomato leaf problems help you figure out what’s wrong and what, if anything, you can do about it.

Having troubles with your tomato fruit? Read this guide to tomato fruit problems.

If you’re a book person, you’ll love these resources for growing tomatoes that I keep in my garden library.

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There’s a lot of information in this article.

Feel free to read about all of them, but if it seems overwhelming, scan through the bolded words for the particular symptom you’ve noticed on your tomato plant and read just that section. And all the way at the bottom, I have some quick tips for dealing with tomato leaf problems.

Also, make sure you pin this article for later so you can refer back to it whenever you see tomato leaf issues come up.

Click to pin now

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Nutrient deficiencies that cause pale or yellow leaves on tomato plants

Whenever your plant’s leaves look pale, but the plant is otherwise healthy, try adding an organic liquid fertilizer first. Neptune’s Harvest is a reliable brand that we frequently use. Liquid fertilizer is more quickly absorbed, and you should notice improvement within a day or two.

(Video) Diseases of Concern for Tomatoes

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Yellow leaves on tomato plant are often due to nutrient deficiency

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Whatever the deficiency, the liquid fertilizer should take care of it. But if you want to know exactlywhich nutrient is deficient, you might be able to figure it out by looking at the specific pattern of yellowing.

If you notice your young leaves (those at the top of the plant)areyellow with green veins, suspect iron deficiency. Check your soil pH to make sure it is between 6 and 6.8. If it’s too high, your tomato can’t take up necessary nutrients including iron.

If you notice older leaves (those at the bottom of the plant)are yellow with green veins, suspect potassium deficiency.Tomato Leaf Problems: A Visual Guide - You Should Grow (4)

If you notice dark spots within the yellow areas and the leaves are small and narrow, you might have a zinc deficiency.

If young leaves are pale and the growing tips of your tomato plant die, suspect calcium deficiency.

Stunted plants with general yellowing of the leaves is an indication of nitrogen deficiency.

It’s best practice to have your soil tested to confirm nutrient deficiencies before adding anything other than organic fertilizer and compost.

Adding too much synthetic fertilizer can burn your plants, and overuse of lime and wood ash can alter your soil pH causing more problems with nutrients than they prevent.

Learn about using fertilizer in your veggie garden.

Yellow tomato leaves due to pests

Pests are a common cause of tomato leaf problems. They are often carriers of tomato diseases as well, so it’s prudent to keep an eye out for any insects on your tomatoes. Read about some of the bugs I’ve found in my tomatoes.

Aphids love tomato plants and cause yellow, misshapen, and sticky leaves. Look for tiny insects on the undersides of leaves and on the stem. These pests will suck the sap from your tomato plant and can be a real problem in any garden.

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They can be many colors, but we often see the red/pink ones. Ants love the sticky substance they excrete, and you may have an issue with both insects at the same time.

(Video) 5 Tomato Grow Mistakes To Avoid

There are several options for organic aphid control including neem oil and diatomaceous earth.

Brownish, finely dotted leaves with thin webs are an indication of spider mites. Look for tiny spider-like insects on your leaves that make fine webs between and below the leaves. Infested leaves will dry up and fall off.

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Spider mites and aphidscan be treated with diatomaceous earth (DE). DE is a natural substance that is readily available at local garden centers.

We use a plant duster like this oneto apply diatomaceous earth to affected plants. This powder will cut through the aphids’ soft exoskeletons and cause them to dehydrate and die.

Rain and watering will negate the effect of the DE so reapply as needed. Be careful to use DE in well-ventilated areas as inhaling this powder can cause damage to your lungs. And the lungs of kids, pets, and chickens, too!

If they get really bad, other forms of organic pest control including insecticidal soaps and spinosad sprays can also help.

Yellow leaves with holes

Whenever you see holes in your tomato leaves, you should suspect insect damage. Colorado potato beetles, tomato hornworms, grasshoppers, and flea beetles are all common culprits. Remove and squish thesepests when you see them and utilize organic pest control practices to manage them.

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Yellow leaves and plants that wilt

There are several kinds of wiltcaused by bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and toxins that can affect tomatoes. Regardless of the cause of the wilt, it’s best to remove severely affected plants from your garden and destroy them.

For mild infections, remove affected leaves (usually the lower leaves) and send them to the landfill or burn them in an areawell removed from your garden. Do not compost diseased plants or leaves.

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Fusarium and Verticillium wilt cause yellowing and wilting beginning with the lower leaves.

Tomatoes planted within about 50 feet of a black walnut tree, may suddenly wilt and die. This is caused a toxin secreted from the roots of black walnut trees and tree stumps.

Nematodes in the soil can infect the roots of your plants and cause wilt. If you pull up wilted plants and notice swollen sections in the root balls, nematodes may be the problem. Choose resistant varieties and/or add parasitic nematodes to decrease the incidence of disease.

There are many varieties of tomatoes that are documented to be resistant to various types of wilt. Look for resistance codes BFNV (Bacterial, Fusarium, Nematodes, Verticillium).

(Video) SOLVED! - Easily identify Indeterminate tomato plants from Determinate tomato plants.

A note about resistance: don’t expect resistant varieties not to be affected by these diseases. Expect them to tolerate the disease. Remove and destroy affected leaves as they appear, and the plant should continue to produce fruit for you.

Yellow leaves with brown spots, mottled, or dappled appearance

Pale thin spots like the ones below are due to leaf burn. Leaves will experience sunburn when they haven’t been properly hardened off or when water droplets concentrate light on the leaves. If the burn is not too extensive, your plants will heal on their own and are not cause for concern.

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Leaf problems due to tomato plant diseases

Tobacco Mosaic Virus

Dappled yellow leaves with twisty new growthare common with tobacco mosaic virus. This virus is often transmitted by insects and especially aphids.

Do not try to treat these plants. Destroy them and remove them from your property, and be sure to wash your hands after touching any plant you suspect could be infected with this virus.

When choosing tomato varieties for future gardening seasons, look for the TMV resistant label.

Bacterial Speck and Bacterial Leaf Spot

Small dark spots on leaves that then turn brown and fall off are a symptom of bacterial speck and bacterial leaf spot. These diseases thrive in hot, humid environments and can be transmitted by your hands and garden tools.

Be careful working with plants suspected to be infected with this disease.To prevent future issues, remove and destroy severely infected plants and choose varieties with BLS and PST resistance in the future.

Late Blight on tomatoes

Leaves develop brown patches that turn dry and paperywhen they become infected with late blight. Sometimes a white mold grows along the edges of the brown patches. If your tomato plants have late blight you will also notice blackened areas along the stems and the tomatoes develop hard brown lesions.

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Late blight on a tomato plant.

Late blight will wipe out your tomato crop, and there is no treatment for infected plants. So try to prevent this disease by removing and destroying infected plants. Don’t compost them. Send them to the landfill and clean and remove all remnants of the infected crops from your garden.

Here’s a video from the University of Maine about late blight:

For future crops, try applying a preventative copper fungicide or Bacillus subtilis spray, make sure to water your plants at the base as wet conditions favor the spread of this disease, and look for resistant varieties labeled LB.

Septoria Leaf Spot

Septoria leaf spot has a similar appearance, but the brown patches are circular with light centers and dark specks. And the disease will start with the older leaves. Trim off infected leaves and remove them from your garden. Sanitize your hands after dealing with infected plants.

(Video) Plant Health & Disease Troubleshooting Guide

Early Blight on tomato plants

Early blight causes spots of dark concentric rings on leaves and stem of the lower plant first.

Early blight tends to strike your tomato plants when they’re loaded with fruit and days are humid and warm.

Preventative sprays may help slow the onset and spread of the disease, but infected plants should be removed and destroyed. Look for resistant varieties labeled AB (A for Alternaria fungalspecies) for future gardens.

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Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Dark brown rings on the leaves can also be caused by tomato spotted wilt virus. In this disease process, you’ll also notice brown streaks on the stems, stunted or one-sided growth, and green rings on immature fruit.

This disease is spread by tiny flying insects called thrips. Check purchase plants carefully for signs of thrips and disease before bringing them home to your garden.

Practice good pest control and remove infected plants to control the spread of this disease. Resistant varieties are labeled TSWV.

Bacterial Canker disease on tomato plant leaves

Leaves with brown edges may be caused by bacterial canker. Lower leaves will also curl up and you may see light brown streaks on the stems of your plant. This disease often shows up after plants have been injured, so be careful when trimming your plants not to leave open wounds.

A note about disease resistance:

Don’t expect resistant varieties not to be affected by these diseases. Expect them to tolerate the disease. Remove and destroy affected leaves as they appear, and the plant should continue to produce fruit for you.

Tomato leaf problems you should not worry about

Tomato leaf curl is often an environmental change due to stress. With no other symptoms of disease, no treatment is necessary.

Purple leaves are caused by expression of anthocyanin due to light exposure. Often appearing on plants grown under intense light, there is no cause for concern or need for treatment of purple tomato leaves.

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Phew! Did you make it through all of that?

Thanks for sticking around this long! There’s too much information to commit it all to memory, so here’s the take home message.

Quick tips for dealing with tomato leaf problems.

  1. Make sure your plants have adequate nutrients. Try an organic liquid fertilizer first.
  2. Check for pests on the stems and undersides of your tomato leaves. Remove them by hand and use organic pest control sprays retreating as needed.
  3. If you do find leaves that are yellow, wilted, or spotty. Remove them immediately and dispose of them in your trash. Wash your hands after you handle any plants you suspect may be infected with fungal, bacterial, or viral diseases.
  4. Plant resistant varieties remembering that even resistant plants can be affected by tomato plant diseases but will often continue to produce if cared for properly (remove infected leaves, water, fertilize).
  5. Severely affected plants should be removed from the garden and disposed of as soon as possible.

FAQs

What's wrong with my tomato plant leaves? ›

Inappropriate levels of water, light, temperature and nutrients can all cause problems with the leaves of tomato plants. These are physiological disorders - problems that are caused by the growing conditions rather than by pests or diseases.

Why are my tomato leaves curling and turning brown? ›

High winds, blowing dust and low humidity can damage the leaves and stems on tomato plants. Heat and low moisture can cause the edges of the tomato leaves to die back, then twist and curl. Hot dry weather may also cause a symptom called physiological leaf roll.

Why are the leaves on my tomato plant turning yellow and brown? ›

Nutrient Deficiency is a Likely Cause. The most common reason why the leaves on established tomato plants turn yellow is a lack of nutrients in the soil. Tomatoes are extremely heavy feeders and require plenty of nutrients to grow healthy and be fruitful. Signs of nutrient deficiency often start low on the tomato plant ...

How do you treat leaf curl on tomato plants? ›

Irregular irrigation and improper pruning cause the leaf edges to roll inward, sometimes to the point of overlapping. When most of the leaves on the plant are affected by this condition it may look serious, but it is not permanent. The remedy is deep, even watering on a regular basis and careful pruning.

Why are my tomato leaves curling up and turning yellow? ›

Curling or rolling of tomato leaves may be caused by various factors, including environmental stresses, viral infection, and herbicide damage.

Videos

1. What is Tomato Leaf Spot?: Inspect Your Plants Weekly to Find Leaf Spot & Diseases - TRG 2014
(Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden))
2. EASY Watering Trick for Amazing Tomato Harvests
(Huw Richards)
3. Yellow Mottled Tomato Leaves a Nitrogen Issue: Identification & Treatment With Soluble Fertilizer
(Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden))
4. Identifying Potassium & Phosphorus Deficiencies in Young Tomato Plants: Magnified Examples and Fix!
(Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden))
5. WHY are my TOMATOES Leaves Turning PURPLE Simple Answer
(I AM ORGANIC GARDENING)
6. Complete Guide to Using Hydrogen Peroxide on Tomato Plants: Recipes, Maintenance, Outbreaks & More
(Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden))

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